The Rev. Charlie Warwick named Deacon-in-Charge at St. Mark's, New Milford

By Canon Charles Cesaretti

WARWICKThe Rev. Charlie Warwick has been appointed Deacon-In-Charge of St. Mark’s, Church, New Milford by the Rt. Rev. Paul Marshall, Bishop of the Diocese of Bethlehem.  Rev. Charlie, as he is affectionately known, conducted his first service at the parish on Sunday, November 13.  On Sunday, November 20, the congregation held a “Meet and Greet” reception in the Parish Hall immediately following the regular 11:00 AM Worship Service.

St. Mark’s was established in 1816 by early pioneers who brought their beliefs and worship with them to the New Milford area.  In October 1817 a charter by the Governor of Pennsylvania incorporated St. Mark’s. In 1822 the parish of St. Mark’s was admitted into union with the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania.

A church building was raised and consecrated in 1829 by Bishop William White.  Bishop White (1748-1836) was the first Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the first Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania, and the second United States Senate Chaplain.

“For the last 195 years, St. Mark’s has been a part of the New Milford community.  We continue with the same faith and worship as our founders in 1816 and continue to serve the people of the area,” stated Keklak, Senior Warden of the Parish. “We are very pleased that Rev. Charlie will become our pastor.  We are well aware of his many gifts and talents from the time he was with us as a seminarian in the summer of 2008.”

Rev. Charlie was born in Hazleton, attending Hazleton Sr. High School and received his BA degree from King’s College, Wilkes-Barre.  He is a graduate of the PA State Police Academy and the Baltimore Police Academy, serving with several law enforcement agencies.  His specialty is in the area of Police K-9.

Rev. Warwick is a licensed US Coast Guard Merchant Marine Captain and worked for 10 years in the Wildwood/Cape May, New Jersey area.  Currently, he works for the PA Department of Transportation (Penn Dot).

He is a 32nd degree Mason, a Knights Templar, Shriner, Elk, Lion, and Assistant Fire Chief.

He was called to ministry later in life and completed his ministry formation process by attending the Bishop’s School in the Diocese of Bethlehem.  As a part of his ministry formation, he completed his Clinical Pastoral Education at St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, PA.  He was ordained deacon on November 1, 2011.

Rev. Warwick and his wife Patty have been married for 26 years, and have one daughter.


Bishop Paul Marshall request for flood relief for Northern tier parishes

Colleagues and friends,

Anticipating the worst, I have already designated the convention offering for flood relief in the northern tier. A general appeal is hereby launched: those not attending convention but desiring to aid those stranded or churches damaged, may send contributions to diocesan house, payable to the Bishop's Discretionary Fund. The address is 333 Wyandotte Street, Bethlehem, 18015.

Additionally, this summer I received a very generous gift of $1000 from a source in the northern part of the diocese. Appropriately, I will add that to the funds available.

I will ask Mo. Maureen Hipple and Fr. Charles Cesaretti to jointly apportion these funds--please direct requests and suggestions to them. The first $1000 is available immediately, so that those suffering from hunger or thirst can be aided.

It is not clear how bad it will be, but as I write this there is water in the streets of Wilkes-Barre and evacuation have begun; there is waist-high water in parts of New Milford, and no phone service in parts of Bradford County, and so on. This is a time for prayers, and prayers converted to action.

I spoke with Bishop Baxter in Central PA this morning. Parts of Harrisburg are being evacuated, and Hershey has experienced damage to animal life that cannot be evacuated from the zoo. And so on.

My physical therapist, a Hindu, observed this afternoon that nature has reminded us of our frailty. I replied that I agreed, and that we are also reminded of our power to to care for and assist each other.


Best,

+Paul


Summer services at Stevensville begin July 9

A news release from The Episcopal Church in Upper Susquehanna County: St. Paul's Montrose (Paul Walker, rector), St. Mark's New Milford and Christ Church Susquehanna (Randy Lee Webster, priest)

St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Stevensville has announced the opening of their summer services for Saturday, July 9 at 5:00 P.M.  Services will be held there every Saturday at 5:00 P.M. through September 3.  St. Matthew’s is under the care of St. Paul’s Church in Montrose.  The Rev. Paul Walker, Rector of St. Paul’s, will officiate and preach at the service.

St Matthew's Church, Stevensville, in what is now Bradford County, was established in 1799 by sheep farmers who came from Litchfield, CT, following the Revolutionary War. Along with their sheep, they brought their deep faith and commitment to the Church of England. However, the recent War of Independence meant that church was now reconstituted in the United States as of 1789 as the Episcopal Church. Their first services were held in a room over a store, but soon they moved to a church building.

In 1814 the church building burned and construction was soon underway for a new sanctuary. This new building, which still stands, was built in 1820 and consecrated by Bishop William White, the first Bishop of Pennsylvania, in 1824. This majestic structure has stood fast and faithful for over 185 years. It is reported to be the oldest building in the Diocese of Bethlehem still used as a church.

The sanctuary has been refurbished several times over the years, but the “modernization” was the conversion of the whale-oil lamps to kerosene. The original source of heat was a large pot-bellied stove in the rear of the church, which still stands. It is not disconnected for reasons of safety; charred beams under the floor are reminders of fires past.

The interior of the building has been kept as the original, including a balcony with benches, which winds its way along the rear and sidewalls. The windows are mainly clear glass, although there are several tinted or painted memorial windows. There are many interesting appointments and paintings in the church.

Due to changing demographics, St. Matthew's has become essentially inactive as a parish. Seasonal services and special events, such as weddings, are held in the building; and, it is the site of many pilgrimages. Since the early 1930's the care and oversight of the church was given to St. Paul's, Montrose, which is seventeen miles east of the parish on Route 706.


Christmas Festival, Lessons and Carols, Stevensville

From the Episcopal Church in Susquehanna County
The Rev’d Paul Walker, Rector, St. Paul’s Montrose
The Rev’d Randy Lee Webster, Priest, St. Mark’s New Milford and Christ Church Susquehanna

St. Matthew Stevensville St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Stevensville has announced its annual Christmas Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols which will be held on Saturday, December 11 at 3:00 P.M.  The church is located on Route 706 in Stevensville.  The Rev’d Paul Walker, Rector of St. Paul’s, will officiate at the service.  Refreshments will be served following the program.

Everyone is invited to bring boughs of holly and evergreens to decorate the church prior to the service.  Because of the soft ground around the building, St. Matthew’s invites those attending to park at Frank and Mary’s Restaurant, just west of the church, and ride the wagon up to the church.

St Matthew's Church, Stevensville, in what is now Bradford County, was established in 1799 by sheep farmers who came from Litchfield, CT, following the Revolutionary War. Along with their sheep, they brought their deep faith and commitment to the Church of England. However, the recent War of Independence meant that church was now reconstituted in the United States as of 1789 as the Episcopal Church. Their first services were held in a room over a store, but soon they moved to a church building.

In 1814 the church building burned and construction was soon underway for a new sanctuary. This new building, which still stands, was built in 1820 and consecrated by Bishop William White, the first Bishop of Pennsylvania, in 1824. This majestic structure has stood fast and faithful for over 185 years. It is reported to be the oldest building in the Diocese of Bethlehem still used as a church.

The sanctuary has been refurbished several times over the years, but the “modernization” was the conversion of the whale-oil lamps to kerosene. The original source of heat was a large pot-bellied stove in the rear of the church, which still stands. It is not disconnected for reasons of safety; charred beams under the floor are reminders of fires past.

The interior of the building has been kept as the original, including a balcony with benches, which winds its way along the rear and sidewalls. The windows are mainly clear glass, although there are several tinted or painted memorial windows. There are many interesting appointments and paintings in the church.

Due to changing demographics, St. Matthew's has become essentially inactive as a parish. Seasonal services and special events, such as weddings, are held in the building; and, it is the site of many pilgrimages. Since the early 1930's the care and oversight of the church was given to St. Paul's, Montrose, which is seventeen miles east of the parish on Route 706.