Trinity Bethlehem Soup Kitchen Report

January 2015
The Rev. Elizabeth Miller, Deacon
Marcie Lightwood, Social Worker

The Soup Kitchen at Trinity is a community – Trinity’s “second congregation.”

More than 150 people eat lunch together each weekday, served by a team of volunteers that number 55-75 over the course of a week.

Volunteers are essential to the work that the soup kitchen does. Each day there is a head cook and usually 5 – 7 others who chop vegetables, assemble salads, make dressings, prepare fruit salad, cook main dishes, make up plates, serve beverages, make coffee, carry trays, and wash dishes. The preparations begin at 8:30 a.m. and lunch is served noon to 1:00. Cleanup is usually done by 2:30 in the afternoon. That is a compact and fast-paced work day for a large handful of people, but it is not everything that happens.

Each day, a different volunteer drives to Fresh Market in the Promenade shops to pick up donated groceries. Some of it is used in the noontime meal, but most of it is taken home by our guests from tables set up and supervised by another set of volunteers. That assures us that our friends have nutritious food to eat at home as well as for lunch with us.

The Trinity guests can access non-food needs through the social worker. There are several volunteers who help with that aspect of ministry. Some help give out shampoo, OTC pain relievers, cough drops, razors and sanitary needs. Many businesses and congregations have set up drives to collect grooming products and winter accessories to benefit the poor and homeless people we serve.  Once a month, the women of St. Anne’s bring clean, sorted used clothing for guests.

It is by faith that we continue to operate. God is good, and we have a few generous donors: A few parishioners who give monthly and holiday gifts, one of our neighbors sends in $50 a month, and a former parishioner who lives out of state who joyfully gives several thousand dollars a year.  There are several angels from around the Diocese of Bethlehem and the rest of the community who regularly support the work of the soup kitchen. We hold an annual benefit concert, when talented community musicians give of their time and talent and an unnamed friend of the soup kitchen matches all ticket sales. The anonymous foundation continues to support us, although for a lesser amount. We applied to the United Way for funding in 2014 and although we were not selected, we were encouraged to apply again. Our finances are always cause for concern.

Second Harvest Food Bank has been carrying us by not billing us the usual shared maintenance fee and giving us as much of a share of the mixed grants they receive. Our volunteer cooks often have to await the arrival of Fresh Market produce so that they can make salads and fruit to serve. We are stretching every dollar in this way by not buying food, but using donations immediately. The soup kitchen is also in need of a new van. The old one is 15 years old and is no longer safe to transport heavy loads of food from the food bank and other donors. Please join Deacon Liz in her prayers that somehow we can obtain a safe and usable van before the end of this winter.

Partnerships with other organizations add to what we can offer our guests.  Students from Moravian College School of Nursing, Cedar Crest and Northampton Community College  serve guests in ways that contribute to their coursework, often providing educational workshops on health concerns. Moravian Academy students, our neighbors, donate apple pies in the fall, holiday goodies, and make bag lunches for our guests to have over weekends. Students from Northeast Middle School brought in nearly 200 blankets. The charity knitters groups and other knitters generously give many, many hats, mittens and scarves to keep folks warm. The brownie troop and the associated Girl Scouts have donated diapers needed by families with young children.

The ministry to our guests is one where success is difficult to measure.  Feeding 150-170 people a good meal every day is one measure. How we affect lives is another. We feel really good about Jeff, who last year had a three pack-a-day cigarette habit and weighed less than 100 pounds. We talked to him over the course of a few weeks when Deacon Liz and Marcie took him to doctors and hospitals. Because he knewthat we cared about him, Jeff cut down to six to eight cigarettes a day, and with the help of nutritional supplements we gave him, he has regained both his health and 35 pounds.

Leanne was evicted from her apartment, lost all of her ID, exhausted her available money, ran out of medications, stopped taking care of herself and began a descent into failing health and homelessness. Deacon Liz and Marcie Lightwood took Leanne to the hospital and doctor’s visits, visited her during a prolonged stay, helped get her into a programmed shelter, got her replacement identification cards, and help her manage her money. After a very rough two months, Leanne is back to functioning.

Sometimes the help we give our guests means we will not see them again. We have helped folks get boots for work so they could get good jobs and support themselves. As a result of those experiences, the social worker obtained several gift cards to Payless Shoe Stores so that we could quickly meet that need should it again arise. Many times we provided clothing vouchers so people could get the clothing they needed to work.

We have spent endless hours on the phone to advocate for client needs. We have helped folks get into apartments, get telephones, sign up for medical benefits and check on employment options.

And what is the best thing we do with our second congregation? We celebrate! Every holiday is celebrated with special food, entertainment and decorations. The Trinity Soup Kitchen is a community, a place where those without family and friends can come and be a part of something warm and special. It is about so much more than food.

 

 


Reading, Christ Church: Social Ministries

SPARK - Support for Parents and resources for kids
    -  includes healthy nutrition food pantry
    - Angel Tree at Christmas
    - Thanksgiving turkey dinner basket distribution
    - medical / dental screenings as available provided by local clinics
    - clothing and household goods support from our rummage room
 
Narcotics Anonymous meets at Christ Church 3 x /wk.
 
Various Committees serve each month at the local shelter:  Opportunity House
 
Episcopal Church Women - rummage sales and events - all money collected goes to mission projects
 
Berks Women in Crisis CampPeaceworks - volunteers and scholarships
 
SHARE:  Salvation Army Home Heating Oil Assistance Program
 
Kajo Keji collections and donations
 
Joyful Noise Collections each month for different mission needs
 
Donations of goods to Hope Rescue Mission
 
Vacation Bible school offered each year - open to the public
 
Kristallnacht - interfaith Community Service held at Christ Church
 
Labyrinth - ministry at Christ Church, and loaned to other churches as requested
 
Sacred Circle service of Unity with/for all indigenous peoples
 
Healing Ministry:  every Wednesday and the 3rd Sun of each Month
 
Prayer Group Ministry
 
Bible Study and Holy Eucharist at a local Assisted Living Facility
 
Thurs. Morning laity-led Morning Prayer
 
Sponsored engineering congregants to rebuild Haiti and restore clean water following disaster
 
Inner city kids to Wildwood, NJ for a week-end at the beach in conjunction with St. Simeon by the Sea Episcopal Church

Allentown/Bethlehem, St. Andrew's: Social Ministries

---Homeless Overnight Ministry Fridays from December to the end of March (providing supper, overnight sleeping and breakfast for 20-38 men)

---Home and Founding member of the Pennsylvania Avenue Interfaith Food Pantry (first and third Wednesdays of each month) and part of Second Harvest network.

---Community Vegetable Garden

---Provide Evening Meal once a month at Victory House a place for homeless vets in Bethlehem

---CROP Walk (we always have one of the largest groups raising money for hunger programs in the area)

---Periodic "hostel" for out-of-state and diocesan youth groups


Easton, Trinity: Social Ministries

Direct Service:
ARK Soup Kitchen-- every Saturday we serve 60-80 people (Holidays we serve more) since 1996.

Health Ministry - Parish nurses and more. We provide health ministry, basic screening, teaching and pastoral support to both parish members and to Soup Kitchen guests.

Disaster Response: We coordinate with local government and agencies and provide emergency cold-weather shelter, shelter in place or overnight shelter with food and pastoral support in our parish hall and using our new kitchen.

Our parish also supports other agencies in Easton and the Lehigh Valley
Meals on Wheels
Safe Harbor (a homeless shelter) lunch
Third Street Alliance (a shelter and program agency for women)
ProJeCt of Easton (an interfaith direct service agency)
Salvation Army (tutoring, emergency services, work with the incarcerated)
Northampton County Jail (pastoral visiting coordinated by Lehigh County Council of Churches)

Dreams that grants could help make happen:
Support group for formerly incarcerated men over 55 years old, a population high at risk for health issues, joblessness and homelessness.

A street minister (a deacon, a social worker, or ??) to work with the street, SRO hotel population, and working poor who eat in our soup kitchen on navigating what's left of the social safety net, getting mental health and spiritual support.

Health clinic through ARK or through ProJeCt to fill direct care and access gaps for the poor.


Wilkes-Barre, St. Stephen's: Social MInistries

Dental Clinic ;
  free dental clinic appointment only 570-235-5642
  services include: cleanings, x-rays, extractions and fillings

Medical Clinic;
   free Medical clinic , appointment only 570-793-4361
   the clinic also periodically conducts health screenings and educational workshops. part of the clinic is a dispensary for common non-narcotic prescriptions.

Reach @ St Stephens
    Food Pantry and Clothing Closet and.....
    Food Pantry hours are 12:00 pm - 3:00pm daily (unless church is closed)  and is supported by parishioners, Weinberg Food Bank and Food Drives by local agencies including (but not limited to) Kings College campus, Riverside Cafe', Holy Cross Episcopal Church, and serves 200 families per month
     Clothing Closet hours are Tuesday 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM and Wednesday 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM. Supported by donations only from parishioners, community and other parishes clothes are free of charge and are clean and only slightly(gently) worn. Although I have put out "ripped" jeans since they are an existing trend. Families and individuals may access the clothing closet twice a month. Nearly two hundred families utilize our facility.
      the AND ......  Bed Rolls for homeless men and women are available by request and are supplied by "My Brothers Keeper" Jim and Flo Wheatly of Hop Bottom. (we also collect fabric for them to use to make these "ugly quilts")
           for individuals and families just getting a new apartment and need "starting" housewares: plates, cups, mugs, sheets and towels are available by request.
            Mother Teresa's Haven, a mens shelter managed by Catholic Social Services, is housed, in the former drop in center, on a rotation basis with other churches.
             Toys for Tots/Teens - for the past two years St Stephens has been a distribution center for families in need of toys for their children up to age 14 (and occasionally older).  The number of children receiving toys this past year was 472.

Forest City, Christ Church social ministries

[From Jack DeMark]

Here is a list of our mission activities at Christ Church, Forest City.
 
Partner with St Pauls Church Montrose in Bountiful Blessings (provide Easter dinner groceries to low income households),
 
Partner with Weinberg Regional Food Bank and the Forest City Area Emergency Services for once-per-month food pantry for people in Susquehanna, Wayne & Lackawanna counties,
 
Partner with American Legion Post 154 in Montrose for an annual winter coat distribution for anyone in need. A year-long coat drive is conducted by Christ Church in conjunction with this event.

Christ Church is home to three 12 step groups, who hold 6 meetings per week.
 
Hold 4 annual all-u-can eat dinners at low charge.
 
Hold annual blessing of pets (and any properly restrained animals upon request).
 
That's all folks.  (Not!)
Jack


West Pittston, Trinity: Social Ministries

[From John Major, rector]

Trinity Episcopal Church of West Pittston strives to seek and embrace ministries that allow us to live out our mission statement, “Working and praying together to live and build holy community.”

Many of our efforts fall under the umbrella of our “Good Neighbor Ministries,” which include long-standing and ongoing projects aimed at filling unmet needs as we identify them in our community.  These include a parishioner-supported food pantry that provides emergency assistance to dozens of families each year, and a Feed a Friend program that provides homemade frozen meals to homebound neighbors and to those coping with illness or family emergency.  This program is extended to provide rides and other assistance to these neighbors when needed.  Trinity West Pittston also operates a prayer network that is publicized in the weekly paper and open to the public, where people can submit prayer requests by phone or mail and members of the congregation will pray for them.

For the past four years, Trinity has also offered a ministry called MUSICare to young families in the area.  Through the internationally known Music Together program, we bring young families together for a “mommy & me” type class that helps children from birth through age five learn to appreciate and enjoy music, helps parents learn how to incorporate music into their everyday family activities, and provides an opportunity for these young parents to get together for conversation and fellowship.  Through free Music Together demonstrations held in venues such as bookstores, libraries, schools and mothers’ groups, Trinity reaches out to the community at large and offers this fun, enriching experience to families throughout the region.  This ministry recently spawned another ministry, a toy swap, which allows young families a place to share slightly used toys and provides a source of gently used and sometimes new toys that Trinity can share with others in need in the community.

Trinity also participates in shared and regional ministry, including providing toiletries and other items for use by the homeless program at Church of the Good Shepherd in Scranton and regular participation in a yearly evangelism program called Project Presence, that brings all the Luzerne County Episcopal churches together to sponsor a booth at the county fair, where balloons, goodies and literature are handed out to create a positive experience with our church for fairgoers.  In the interest of sustaining the Episcopal presence in our community, Trinity has also entered into agreements with other regional parishes over the last four years in which our rector also served as either a rector or priest in charge at these other parishes, strengthening both parishes and enabling both to have pastoral leadership that guides them to the Gospel ministry of service.

In addition to these ongoing ministries, in the aftermath of a flood in September 2011 that affected more than one third of West Pittston and large sections of nearby towns, Trinity initiated a new ministry called FLOODCare.  This ministry to our flooded neighbors has included hands-on assistance, distribution of gift cards, flood relief items and household goods, opportunities for pastoral care, and ongoing reminders that Trinity West Pittston is ready and available to assist in their recovery for as long as it takes.  We continue to provide help and goods to a number of families who are still not back in their home.
Trinity’s FLOODCare ministry inspired a new regional ministry in disaster preparedness and response.  Housed in a closed Episcopal Church in the geographic center of flood-prone Luzerne County and initially funded by a combination of diocesan funds and grants as well as grants from Episcopal Relief & Development, Episcopal Appalachian Ministries, St. George’s Regional Disaster Recovery & Outreach Center will provide a location to store and distribute disaster supplies, provide shelter for those affected by disasters and those who come to help them, and serve as a site to coordinate disaster preparedness and training throughout the region.  It will also include a feeding program that will provide a needed service in an underserved community afflicted with nearly twice the state level of poverty.  Trinity’s leadership and parishioners continue to support this ministry as part of our own community outreach, mission and ministry.
 
The Rev. John Major
Rector
Trinity Episcopal Church of West Pittston
 
Priest-in-Charge
Saint Clement and Saint Peter Church of Wilkes-Barre
 
Director
The Children’s MUSICare Project featuring Music Together
Trinity Episcopal Church of West Pittston
 
Diocese of Bethlehem Episcopal Relief and Development Representative
 
Director of Saint George’s Regional Disaster Recovery and Outreach Center , Nanticoke, Luzerne County, PA
 
Member of Diocesan Council, Diocese of Bethlehem


Hellertown, St. George's: Social Ministries

[From H. Jonathan Mayo, rector]

- serves meals at Victory House regularly throughout the year

- participates in Heifer project

- regular donations to local foodbank, including food, Outreach money, stuffed bears during Lent

- donate school supplies to Sheridan Elementary School, Allentown

- hats, mittens and gloves for New Jerusalem food bank

- financial support of Hellertown Area Ministerium, including their mission trips

- supported Raudenbush mission to Africa


Lent and Holy Week Offerings around the Diocese of Bethlehem

The following are events and programing planned at various parishes throughout the diocese during Lent.

All through Lent
During Lent Trinity ECW in Carbondale will be selling Welsh cookies $5.00 per "baker's dozen." Call 281-3205 or 785-5673 to place order. Also we will be selling homemade soups: Red Clam Chowder, Pasta Fagiole, Broccali Cheese and Potato Leek  $4.00 per pint and $8.00 per quart on Sundays after the Eucharist (12:00) during coffee hour. Soup will be frozen...just heat and serve!

February 21st: Shrove Tuesday
Shrove Tuesday Pancake and Sausage Supper, Trinity, West Pittston, 3:30 to 7:00 P.M. Cost is $6.00 for Adults and $4.00 for ages 10 and under. Tickets can be purchased from the church office by calling 570-654-3271 or at the door.
Shrove Tuesday, Pancake Supper, St. John's, Palmerton 4:00 to 6:00 P.M. Cost is $5.00 for adults and $3.00 for children.
Dave's Special, Annual Pancake and Sausage Supper, Grace, Allentown, PA 4:30pm to 7:00pm. The cost is $8 for adults, and $4.00 for children ages 6-12. Children ages 5 and under are free. This is an all you can eat event some come early, sit long, and talk endlessly with your friends. Takeouts will be available! Please plan to attend and join us for a good meal, fun and fellowship! There will be Mardi Gras beads, coins, music and of course DOUGHNUTS! DOUGHNUTS! DOUGHNUTS!
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, Christ, Towanda 5:00 P.M. Free will offering for supper.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, Church of the Ephiphany, 25 Church Hill, Clarks Summit 5:00 to 7:00 P.M. Free will offering benefits Dalton Food Pantry. For any questions, please call 570- 563-1564.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, Nativity, Bethlehem 5:30 to 7:00 P.M. Cost is $5.00 and benefits Nativity’s Youth Camp. Entertainment by the Dixieland Five.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, Mediator, Allentown 5:30 to 7:00 P.M. Cost is $4.00 for adults and $2.00 for Children.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 5:30 P.M. Suggested donation is $3.00.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper and Prayer Service, St. Anne's, Trexlertown 5:45 P.M.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, St. George’s, Hellertown 6:00 P.M. $8.00 adults and $4.00 children under 10.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, St. Brigid’s, Nazareth 6:00 P.M.
Shrove Tuesday Mardi Gras Pancake Supper, Grace, Honesdale 6:00 to 9:00 P.M. We will have games for the whole family.  Our featured event is the traditional pancake races.  Any males wishing to compete in the pancake races must wear the appropriate attire of a kerchief and apron.  There will be games for the little ones, teens and adults. Free will donation for the dinner.  Bring your change for the games.  All proceeds from the games will go towards our purchase of an AED (Automated External Defibrillator). Costumes are encouraged.
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.

February 22nd: Ash Wednesday
Impostion of Ashes, Grace, Kingston 7:00 A.M.
Ash Wednesday Eucharist, St. Anne's, Trexlertown 10:30 A.M.
Lenten Organ Recital, St. Stephen’s Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 11:30 A.M. A community soup and sandwich lunch follows.
Ash Wednesday Service and Imposition of Ashes, St. Anne's Trexlertown 12:05 P.M. with Lenten Luncheon.
Imposition of Ashes, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 7:30 A.M. and 6:30 P.M.
Ash Wednesday Eucharist, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.
Ash Wednesday Service, St. Brigid's, Nazareth 7:00 P.M.
Ash Wednesday Eucharist, St. Anne's, Trexlertown 7:00 P.M.
Ash Wednesday Eucharist, St. Paul's, Troy 7:00 P.M.
Ash Wednesday Service, St. Peter's, Tunkhannock 7:00 P.M.
Imposition of Ashes, Prince of Peace, Dallas 7:00 P.M.

February 24th
Stations of the Cross, Christ, 700 Delaware St., Forest City 8:30 A.M. includes pizza sale.
Stations of the Cross, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 6:00 P.M. Followed by a movie series exploring "The Evil in Film" and potluck supper.

February 29th
Lenten Organ Recital, St. Stephen’s Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 11:30 A.M. A community soup and sandwich lunch follows.
Taize Service, St. Peter's, Tunkhannock 5:30 P.M. St. Peter’s Church, Tunkhannock, will offer soup suppers and Taize services during Lent this year.  Supper is at 5.30 pm. service at 6.00 pm.  Come as you are, if you wish you may bring a meatless soup to share, or a loaf of bread. A Taize service starts with love for God and one another, and through prayer, meditation, chant, and song, the gathered community may enter into the joy of God’s presence, and return to the world refreshed and eager to share community with one another.
First Lenten Soup/Bread Supper and Program: “Trials of Jesus:  Voices of the Prosecution”, St. Brigid's, Nazareth 6:00 p.m.
“Teach Us To Pray” – St. Andrew’s Lenten Series, St. Andrew's, Allentown 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Each Lenten gathering will start with our meal at 6:00 pm. The program begins at 6:30 pm. We promise to end by 8:00 pm.
Stations of the Cross, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.
Lenten Program and Book Discussion, Redeemer, Sayre 7:00 P.M. Refreshments served.
Lenten Program: "Making Time for God", St. Anne's, Trexlertown 7:00 P.M.

March 2nd
Stations of the Cross, Christ, 700 Delaware St., Forest City 8:30 A.M. includes pizza sale.
Stations of the Cross, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 6:00 P.M. Followed by a movie series exploring "The Evil in Film" and potluck supper.

March 7th
Lenten Organ Recital, St. Stephen’s Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 11:30 A.M. A community soup and sandwich lunch follows.
Taize Service, St. Peter's, Tunkhannock 5:30 P.M. St. Peter’s Church, Tunkhannock, will offer soup suppers and Taize services during Lent this year.  Supper is at 5.30 pm. service at 6.00 pm. 
Second Lenten Soup/Bread Supper and Program: “Trials of Jesus:  Voices of the Prosecution”, St. Brigid's, Nazareth 6:00 p.m.
“Teach Us To Pray” – St. Andrew’s Lenten Series, St. Andrew's, Allentown 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Each Lenten gathering will start with our meal at 6:00 pm. The program begins at 6:30 pm. We promise to end by 8:00 pm.
Stations of the Cross, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.
Lenten Program and Book Discussion, Redeemer, Sayre 7:00 P.M. Refreshments served.
Lenten Program: "Making Time for God", St. Anne's, Trexlertown 7:00 P.M.


March 9th
Stations of the Cross, Christ, 700 Delaware St., Forest City 8:30 A.M. includes pizza sale.
Stations of the Cross, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 6:00 P.M. Followed by a movie series exploring "The Evil in Film" and potluck supper.

March 14th
Lenten Organ Recital, St. Stephen’s Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 11:30 A.M. A community soup and sandwich lunch follows.
Taize Service, St. Peter's, Tunkhannock 5:30 P.M. St. Peter’s Church, Tunkhannock, will offer soup suppers and Taize services during Lent this year.  Supper is at 5.30 pm. service at 6.00 pm.
Third Lenten Soup/Bread Supper and Program: “Trials of Jesus:  Voices of the Prosecution”, St. Brigid's, Nazareth 6:00 p.m.
“Teach Us To Pray” – St. Andrew’s Lenten Series, St. Andrew's, Allentown 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Each Lenten gathering will start with our meal at 6:00 pm. The program begins at 6:30 pm. We promise to end by 8:00 pm.
Mid-Lent Retreat Soup and Bread Meal with Stations of the Cross, Prince of Peace, Dallas 6:00 P.M.
Stations of the Cross, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.
Lenten Program and Book Discussion, Redeemer, Sayre 7:00 P.M. Refreshments served.
Lenten Program: "Making Time for God", St. Anne's, Trexlertown 7:00 P.M.

March 16th
Stations of the Cross, Christ, 700 Delaware St., Forest City 8:30 A.M. includes pizza sale.
Stations of the Cross, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 6:00 P.M. Followed by a movie series exploring "The Evil in Film" and potluck supper.

March 21st
Lenten Organ Recital, St. Stephen’s Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 11:30 A.M. A community soup and sandwich lunch follows.
Taize Service, St. Peter's, Tunkhannock 5:30 P.M. St. Peter’s Church, Tunkhannock, will offer soup suppers and Taize services during Lent this year.  Supper is at 5.30 pm. service at 6.00 pm.
Fourth Lenten Soup/Bread Supper and Program: “Trials of Jesus:  Voices of the Prosecution”, St. Brigid's, Nazareth 6:00 p.m.
“Teach Us To Pray” – St. Andrew’s Lenten Series, St. Andrew's, Allentown 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Each Lenten gathering will start with our meal at 6:00 pm. The program begins at 6:30 pm. We promise to end by 8:00 pm.
Stations of the Cross, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.
Lenten Program and Book Discussion, Redeemer, Sayre 7:00 P.M. Refreshments served.
Lenten Program: "Making Time for God", St. Anne's, Trexlertown 7:00 P.M.

March 23rd
Stations of the Cross, Christ, 700 Delaware St., Forest City 8:30 A.M. includes pizza sale.
Stations of the Cross, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 6:00 P.M. Followed by a movie series exploring "The Evil in Film" and potluck supper.

March 28th
Lenten Organ Recital, St. Stephen’s Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 11:30 A.M. A community soup and sandwich lunch follows.
Taize Service, St. Peter's, Tunkhannock 5:30 P.M. St. Peter’s Church, Tunkhannock, will offer soup suppers and Taize services during Lent this year.  Supper is at 5.30 pm. service at 6.00 pm.
Fifth Lenten Soup/Bread Supper and Program: “Trials of Jesus:  Voices of the Prosecution”, St. Brigid's, Nazareth 6:00 p.m.
“Teach Us To Pray” – St. Andrew’s Lenten Series, St. Andrew's, Allentown 6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Each Lenten gathering will start with our meal at 6:00 pm. The program begins at 6:30 pm. We promise to end by 8:00 pm.
Stations of the Cross, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.
Lenten Program and Book Discussion, Redeemer, Sayre 7:00 P.M. Refreshments served.
Lenten Program: "Making Time for God", St. Anne's, Trexlertown 7:00 P.M.

March 30th
Stations of the Cross, Christ, 700 Delaware St., Forest City 8:30 A.M. includes pizza sale.
Stations of the Cross, St. Stephen's Pro-Cathedral, Wilkes-Barre 6:00 P.M. Followed by a movie series exploring "The Evil in Film" and potluck supper.

April 1st: Palm Sunday
Holy Eucharist with neighborhood palm procession led by Henry and Honey Bun, the Grace adopted donkeys, Grace, Kingston 10:00 A.M.

April 4th
Taize Service, St. Peter's, Tunkhannock 5:30 P.M. St. Peter’s Church, Tunkhannock, will offer soup suppers and Taize services during Lent this year.  Supper is at 5.30 pm. service at 6.00 pm.
Stations of the Cross, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.

April 5th: Maundy Thursday
Agape Feast in the Nave, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M followed by the Holy Eucharist and foot washing.  An Agape Feast recalls an early church tradition where a community gathered for Eucharist shared in a common meal.
Prayer Vigil, Grace, Kingston 8:00 P.M. (24 hour prayer vigil)
Maundy Thursday Service and Stripping of the Altar, St. Paul's, Troy 7:00 P.M.

April 6th: Good Friday
Good Friday Liturgy and Stations of the Cross, St. Paul's, Troy 1:00 P.M.
Good Friday Liturgy with Veneration of the Cross, Grace, Kingston 6:30 P.M.

April 7th: Holy Saturday
Great Vigil of Easter, Grace, Kingston 10:30 P.M.

April 8th: Easter Sunday
Holy Eucharist, Grace, Kingston 10:00 A.M.


Grace, Honesdale dedicates recently gifted Columbarium

[By Fr. Ed Erb]

“I don’t want to have the parish buy a columbarium, Jean.” said Fr. Edward Erb, of Grace Episcopal Church in Honesdale, to one of his parishioners, “because as soon as we do, you’ll die.”  But that did not deter the parishioner.  One Friday, her husband drove her to the Church.  She was not strong enough to get out of the car.  When the priest came out to greet her, she handed him two checks to pay for the unit and its installation.  A week and a half later, she did die.  But she got her wish.
 
Columbarium dedication photoSMALLSunday November 6th for the commemoration of All Saints, Fr. Erb, surrounded by Jean’s family dedicated the columbarium to the glory of God, and in memory of Jean Hoerter.
 
A columbarium is a wall of niches specially designed to give permanent rest for the cremated remains (“cremains”) of the faithful.  “It is a wonderful stewardship in many ways,” explained Fr. Erb.  “First of all, it saves precious earth from row after row of graves in a cemetery.  Secondly, cremation is less expensive than interring a body in the ground, and saves considerable on funeral costs, not having a coffin to purchase, for one thing.  In addition, having the remains of the faithful placed at rest in the Church continually reminds us of the saints who have gone before us.”
 
The columbarium is placed in the Baptistry at Grace Church and contains 64 niches.  The reason for the placement is that in Baptism, Christians are assured of the hope of resurrection to new life after the death of this life.  At Grace Church, as in many churches, the Baptistry is placed at a major entrance into the Church.  Again, the symbolism of “entry” - in this case entry into eternal rest with God.  Grace Church is also proud to house the family baptismal font of Philip Hone, himself, originally placed at Trinity Church, Wall Street, New York City, and for over 150 years housed in the Baptistry at Grace Church.  “Two great benefactors of the parish are memorialized together,” concluded Fr. Erb.
 
Grace Church will be one of the sites honored by the Houses of Worship Tour sponsored by the Greater Honesdale Partnership later this month.  The public is warmly welcome to visit the Church to learn more about its history, and its future.

[photo caption - pictured Mr. William Hoerter, husband of the benefactor, Fr. Ed Erb, at the Columbarium in Grace Episcopal Church.]


September 11 Services of Remembrance in the diocese

September 11 Services of Remembrance from around the diocese in chronological order

St. Anne's, Trexlertown:  8:00 and 10:15 A.M. During both services on September 11 we will have special prayers and remembrances to commemorate the lives that were lost on this dreadful day and to seek God’s guidance and wisdom as we live with the ramifications and impact of this national tragedy on our country and on the world. Please come to church prepared to stop whatever you are doing when you hear the sound of the drum and the cymbal. It will be a sacred moment of silent prayer. When you arrive at church on September 11, the greeters will remind you about keeping silence at these significant moments of September 11.

Christ Church, Forest City: 9:00 A.M. service with special hymns, prayers, and will host "first responders" from the surrounding communities.

Church of the Good Shepherd and St. John, Milford: 10:00 A.M. "Eucharist in Remembrance of 9/11" Church bells will be rung 10 times each on the times of the four plane crashes - 8:46am, 9:03am, 9:38am, and 10:03am. After a silent processional the service with continue with special prayers, hymns, and anthem. The church will remain open from 12:00 P.M. to 3:00 P.M. as a sanctuary for those who wish to observe a reverent silence, hosted by the Daughters of the King.

Trinity Church, Carbondale: 11:00 A.M. service with special hymns, prayers of the people and remembrances for the victims and their families.

Providence Place Retirement Home, Drums: 1:00 P.M. Members of a Gospel Quartet will lead the hymns, members of the staff and resident will assist with the readings. Lead by Deacon Marion Meiss of St. Peter's, Hazleton

Trinity Church, Easton: 1:30 P.M. organ voluntary followed by the service at 2:00 P.M. An Interfaith Service of Remembrance and Hope  to be webcast live on Sunday, September 11. The service will be streamed live at live.trinityeaston.org. A Service of Remembrance and Hope will include interfaith prayers and hymns. In addition, music will be provided by: a double quartet of members of the Metropolitan Opera Chorus of New York City, a local Chamber Orchestra and the Easton Area High School Choir. Scheduled selections will include: Faure's "Requiem in d minor, Op 48" (Intoit and Kyrie; Sanctus; Pie Iesu; Agnus Dei and Lux Aeterna; In Paradisum.), Bach's "Cantata 106: Gottes Zeit ist dis Allerbeste Zeit" movement III a & b. Participating congregations include: B'nai Abraham Synagogue, Easton; College Hill Presbyterian Church; 1st Presbyterian Church of Easton; 1st United Church of Christ of Easton; St. John's Lutheran Church of Easton; Temple Covenant of Peace, in Easton; The Muslim Community of Easton/Phillpsburg and Trinity Episcopal Church.  Go to www.trinityeaston.org and click on the link to the webcast.. Read more about it, including compatibilities with your computer, smartphone or tablet here. You may also go to Trinity's UShare page, live.trinityeaston.org. For information, call Trinity Church at 610-253-0792

Grace Church, Honesdale: 2:00 P.M. Service of Remembrance for 9/11 Meditation, inter-faith prayers, music and sharing will all be a part of the service as we remember all who were affected by the tragedies, especially within our community.  A time to remember those who were killed in New York City, southwestern Pennsylvania and Washington DC will be an important part of the service.  Grief counselors will be on hand should anyone need to talk privately.  “It is our hope to move forward bringing God’s peace into our community,” commented Ms. Frances Hlavacek of Grace Church who has been a member of the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem’s Peace Commission. The service will be held in the handicap-accessible Parish Hall of Grace Church, located on the corner of Church and Ninth Streets in downtown Honesdale.  For more information, you may call the parish office at (570) 253-2760.  All are welcome to attend.

Trinity, Mt. Pocono: 2:00 P.M. Interfaith Service of Remembrance and Prayer. Representatives and members of our global community, Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh, will gather together to speak about our lives as one in community and to pray together as one for a world of peace and community which can only be gained through the gift of open dialogue as sisters and brothers who seek to move forward beyond the smoke and ashes and offer healing in order to embrace a renewed life together. Please contact the Parish Office at 570 839 9376 for information or go to www.tinitymtpocono.org for directions.

Cathedral Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem: 5:00 P.M.  9/11 Interfaith Service of Remembrance and Reconciliation, Nativity, Bethlehem 5:00 P.M. Clergy participating are: The Rt. Rev. Paul V. Marshall, Bishop of The Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem; The Very Rev. Anthony R. Pompa, Cathedral Dean & Rector; Rabbi Allen Juda,  Congregation Brith Sholom; Metin Bor, Muezzin, Lehigh Dialogue Center; Mohamed Rajmohamed, Al-Ahad Islamic Center; The Rt. Rev. Hopeton Clennon, Bishop of the Moravian Church, Northern Province and Chaplain, Moravian College; The Rev. Canon Mariclair Partee, Cathedral Canon, Ministry of the Baptized; Cantor Ellen Sussman, Temple Shirat Shalom; and The Rev. Canon George Loeffler, Deacon and Bishop's Chaplain. Music provided by the Cathedral Choir under the direction of Canon Russell Jackson will present selections from Faure’s Requiem, with Naoko Cauller as soloist. A reception will follow in Sayre Hall, and all are welcome.

St. Paul's, Montrose: 5:00 P.M. Vesper Service to Remember 9/11will be held at the Second Sunday Vesper Service on Sunday, September 11, 2011 at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Church Street Montrose, PA  The solemn service will provide a time of deep spiritual reflection and include scripture readings, prayers, and music prepared especially for the anniversary.  The Rev. Canon Charles Cesaretti will welcome the congregation; the greeters are Linda and George Gardner.  The Lector will be Amy Johnson.  Sarah S. Bertsch will be the organist.  MaryAnn DeWitt will be at the piano.  A buffet supper will be served immediately following the service in the Parish House.  The cooks are Ed and Barbara Schmidt and John and Sharon Siedlecki.  Gail and Doug Overfield will be the servers. All are welcome on this special day to remember the victims and those who miss them, as well as the rescue workers and all responders.

Church of the Epiphany, Clarks Summit: 7:00 P.M. Service of Remembrance with two church joint choir, psalms and prayers


More on Pennsylvania floods including links to news outlets in our area

[posted by Bill Lewellis to Bakery]

Susquehanna River crests in Wilkes-Barre; Delaware also crests in Easton and Riegelsville
By Tracy Jordan, Of The Morning Call
7:39 a.m. EDT, September 9, 2011

The levee system in Wilkes-Barre held back the force of the Susquehanna River at one of its historic high points overnight, sparing the city of about 50,000 from the devastation seen during the 1972 floods from Hurricane Agnes.

Meanwhile, the Delaware River in Easton and Riegelsville also has crested below major flood stage as of Friday morning.

In Easton, the river crested at 3 a.m. at 29.23, which is just below major flood stage of 30 feet but about 8 feet above flood stage. As of 5:30 a.m., the river was at 29.12 feet. Sections of Larry Holmes Drive and Route 611 remain closed in Easton.

In Riegelsville, the river crested at 5:15 a.m. at 28.06 feet, which is about two feet below major flood stage and six feet above flood stage. As of 5:30 a.m., the river was at 28.03 feet and falling.

Across the state, though, flooding from Susquehanna River, smaller rivers, creeks and streams devastated homes, businesses and attractions like Knoebel's Amusement Park in Elysburg, the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds and Hershey Park.

Smaller communities immediately north and south of Wilkes-Barre not included in the levee project completed in 2002 have been inundated with floodwaters.

More here, including video and photos.


Federal disaster areas declared in 42 PA counties
By Tracy Jordan, Of The Morning Call
7:16 a.m. EDT, September 9, 2011
Nearly 60 percent of Pennsylvania's counties have been declared federal disaster areas, setting the stage for state and local agencies to seek federal funding to cover 75 percent of expenses incurred in response to the flooding emergency brought on by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee.

More here.

More at ...
The Times Leader, Wilkes-Barre

The Times-Tribune, Scranton

The Daily Review (Towanda, Sayre, Troy)

Thanks,
Bill


St. Peter's, Tunkhannock to host benefit concert for H.A.N.D.S. of Wyoming County

Breakout_pic [From David Martin]

A free concert by an award winning a Capella quartet will take place Sunday September 18, at  5:00 PM at St Peter's Church, 3832 Route 6, a mile east of Tunkhannock. “Breakout” is a quartet with members from both New York and Pennsylvania.  Formed in 2007, their first onstage performance occurred at the Barbershop Harmony Society Seneca Land District Competition in October of that year, where they won first place.   They went on to win another District Championship, and in 2010 the quartet represented the Seneca Land District at the international quartet competition held in Philadelphia.

The members consist of Kevin Jones  - Bass, Jerry Schmidt – Tenor, Dave Scott – Baritone, and Mike Spencer – Lead.  Each of the singers has appeared with numerous other award winning quartets, and they have also performed similar benefit concerts for other worthy causes.  Collectively, they have about 100 years of Barbershop quartet experience. The Endless Mountains Barbershop Chorus of Wyoming County will also present a  selection of songs.

H.A.N.D.S. (Helping Area Needs for Diverse Early Child Care Services) of Wyoming County is a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the quality and availability of early care and education in Wyoming County.  H.A.N.D.S. implements planning strategies that allow growth and development of quality early child care and access to education services.  The proceeds of a free will offering will go to support H.A.N.D.S. Projects for Wyoming County children.  Refreshments and a reception will follow the concert.  For further information call 836-2233.


Canon Mark Laubach's 25th

May 22 Evensong and Laubach Celebration

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Pro Cathedral in Wilkes-Barre will celebrate the 25th anniversary of Canon Mark Laubach’s service to the church following a choral Evensong at 5:00 pm Sunday, May 22, in the church, at 35 South Franklin Street.  Evensong is one of the most beautiful services in the Anglican tradition, and the public is invited to stay for the reception afterward.

Music at the Evensong will include Let the People Praise Thee, O God, the majestic anthem composed by William Mathias for the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in July, 1981.  The St. Stephen’s choirs under Mark Laubach’s direction also will sing the Evening Canticles in E by Herbert Murrill, and William Smith’s Preces & Responses.

Mark Laubach came to St. Stephen's as Minister of Music January 2, 1986, just two years after winning the National Young Artists Competition in organ performance.  He was appointed a Fellow in Church Music at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC, and shortly thereafter came to St. Stephens.  Canon Laubach has performed in major venues all over the world, including the Kennedy Center, St. Thomas Church and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine (both in New York), and in London at St. Paul’s Cathedral and Westminster Abbey, as well as the King’s Chapel in Cambridge.

Canon Laubach administers a busy liturgical, choral, concert, and broadcasting schedule at St. Stephen’s. In 2002, under his supervision the church’s large pipe organ was rebuilt by the Berghaus Organ Company of Chicago. This instrument now stands among the finest of its type in the Mid-Atlantic region, having won high praise from organists and audiences.
--
Suzanne Fisher Staples
www.suzannefisherstaples.com
570.945.7143
570.561.5962 (cell)


Social Ministries now accepting grant requests from New Hope Campaign

[From the Social Ministries Committee]

17 May 2011

Dear Partners in Ministry,

The Social Ministries Committee is now ready to receive and consider requests for disbursements from the New Hope Campaign.  The total amount we are able to grant for the 2011-12 calendar year is $100,000.  Therefore, we are inviting Letters of Intent from parishes and Episcopal related organizations within the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem.  The Deadline for Letters of Intent is 15 July 2011.

The Letter of Intent should contain:

  • The Mission Statement of the parish/organization
  • A summary of the proposal including a brief project description
  • An outline of the focus and scope (who will be served?)
  • Amount to be requested from the SMC (one time or multi-year request)
  • Partner churches, agencies, organizations, etc., if any
  • Project start date
  • Name, e-mail and day and evening telephone number of contact person(s).

Letters of Intent should be sent to The Rev’d Daniel C. Gunn, St. Stephen’s Pro-cathedral, 35 South Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA  18701 or emailed to dgunn@ststephenswb.org with “Social Ministry Application” in the subject line.

A member of the Social Ministries Committee will be in contact soon thereafter.  These Letters are preliminary proposals and will be considered in the order in which they are received.  Applications will be sent after the initial contact.

In peace,

The Rev’d Daniel C. Gunn, Chair


Six chronically homeless persons will live next to Grace Episcopal Church in Allentown

By Libby House and Bill Lewellis

Grace House2 On April 20, Grace House at 112 North Fifth Street, Allentown, a newly renovated three-story brick and stucco property next to Grace Episcopal Church, will welcome its first homeless residents.

The creation and development of a group home to provide permanent housing in apartments for six chronically homeless persons began a few years ago with a conversation between Robert Wilkins, president of the board of New Bethany Ministries from 1998 to 2010, and Elizabeth House, senior warden of Grace Church.

It was the brain child of Wilkins, House, William Kuntze, former executive director of New Bethany and Patrick Malloy,  former rector of Grace Episcopal Church. Their initiative received enthusiastic moral support as well as financial commitment from Bethlehem Diocese Bishop Paul V. Marshall.

Grace House Funding for Grace House came from a wide variety of sources. Grace Church donated to New Bethany Ministries half the value of the property which for nearly 15 years had served as the church's headquarters for its former AiDS Outreach Ministry that closed in December 2007 when federal and state funding dried up. The $500,000 costs for renovating the facility were paid for by a $250,000 grant from the Federal Home Loan Bank, Pittsburgh, through KNBT grants from Lehigh County and the City of Allentown, and additional money generously provided by Episcopal Ministries of the Diocese of Bethlehem, the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem, the PA Department of Community and Economic Development, Senator Pat Brown, Representative Jennifer Mann, The Century Fund, and individual donors.

The new group home will become part of the City of Allentown's First Lady's Commission to End Chronic Homelessness in 10 years. The six individuals who will gain the safety and stability of a permanent residence through this project represent 10 percent of those described as chronically homeless in Allentown in 2010.

Grace House will be a joint project of New Bethany Ministries of Bethlehem, sponsored by the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem and community operated, and Grace Allentown, a parish of the Diocese of Bethlehem. The facility's location in downtown Allentown will allow New Bethany Ministries, which has been working to address the needs of homeless people and others on the margins of our society, primarily in Bethlehem, for 25 years, to expand its outreach. it will also allow the Grace Church community to continue to develop and increase its mission and ministry to the people of the inner city neighborhoods of Allentown, where it already provides strategic services to the poor.

in addition to New Bethany and Grace Church, the Lehigh County Conference of Churches will play a crucial role in supporting and supervising the residents who will live in the facility by providing rent subsidies and social services. The organization will select the individuals who are to live in the group home and will assign a caseworker to help see that those living in Grace House will have the assistance they need to help them become independently functioning and contributing members of the community. They will assist with access to public benefit funding, subsidized meals, clothing services, referrals for medical and mental health treatment, and job skills training.
Grace Episcopal Church houses several ministries that will also provide additional support for the group home residents, such as supplemental groceries through its food pantry, Grace Community Foundation which provides supplemental food in a respectful manner to some 6,000 ethnically, religiously and racially diverse persons in need every year; access to a job placement counselor through the City's Weed and Seed Program; a GED program for those who dropped out of school who wish to work to earn their diplomas; the iMPACT juvenile offender program; services from paralegals from North Penn Legal Services; and blood pressure screenings. The church hopes that the tenants may wish to become part of the Grace Church community and will benefit from the possibilities that can be derived from relationships offered there.

Once described at a national conference because of its outreach ministries as the largest small church in the United States, Grace Church also owns Grace Montessori School, which provides scholarships to one-third of its diverse student body of more than 100 in a newly built, state-of-the-art facility.
 
Episcopal Ministries of the Diocese of Bethlehem, Inc., dba New Bethany Ministries, is an agency of the Diocese of Bethlehem and as such is a church-sponsored, non-profit corporation whose purpose is to organize and operate housing and social ministries with related services in the geographic area of the Diocese of Bethlehem for the care and relief of the needy, poor, displaced and other distressed persons.
 
With its long history and experience in battling homelessness, New Bethany Ministries brings compassion and expertise to the Grace House initiative at a level that cannot be overstated. This ministry of The Episcopal Church summons the talents of approximately 20 employees and 600 volunteers to serve the needs of the homeless, the hungry, the mentally ill, and the poor. In addition to managing its many shelters, homes, and apartments and providing much needed social services, the agency also serves breakfast and lunch daily in its hospitality center in South Bethlehem and offers emergency food pantry services. it is hoped that the unique combination of experience, expertise, services, proximity, and common mission of these three social justice power houses, New Bethany Ministries, Grace Church, and LCCC, will serve as a model for faith-based groups wishing to work together to address the problems of the most desperate of individuals living in our society, making a permanent difference in their lives that will restore them to dignity and independence.

New Bethany's 25-year history has included one deep valley. It was buried in debt in 1998. Low morale had spread through the staff as its executive director and two executive board members resigned. The staff had to be cut from 16 to 10. The organization was close to going out of business. That’s when Wilkins, retired senior vice president of finance for Bethlehem Steel and former Bethlehem city administrator took a leave of absence from his business to serve as interim executive director during New Bethany’s crisis when the ministry was having a hard time finding the $1,000 a day in donations (half the budget) it takes to operate its shelters, subsidized housing and meal programs. That's when the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem, New Bethany’s 1983 founder, stepped in.

The Diocese of Bethlehem provided New Bethany the security for a loan and lent the charity $200,000 without interest. Bishop Paul Marshall convened a “Blue Ribbon” panel of leaders in business, social service, church and philanthropic fields to explore the problems and challenges facing New Bethany. The panel met during the last quarter of 1998 and offered a series of recommendations to the New Bethany board. By 2001, the charity cut its annual spending plan by $100,000. It got back up to a full staff of 16. It began offering just as many services as before its financial fall.

[Mrs. Elizabeth "Libby" House is senior warden of Grace Episcopal Church, Allentown, and director of the Grace Montessori School. Canon Bill Lewellis, now retired, served for nearly 25 years as communication minister for the Diocese of Bethlehem.]

Download: (1) An outline of the origin of New Bethany Ministries, by Bill Lewellis, (2) New Bethany's Two-Year Recovery, by Bill Lewellis, Diocesan Life, Dec. 2001, (3) Remarks by Beth Reed at Grace House open house, 4/7/11.

Download NBM.Outline of Origins

Download NBM’s Two-Year Recovery.Lewellis

Download NBM.GraceHouse.Holy Ground

 


Trinity Easton to hold Broadway Revue May 6, 7 & 8

BRING YOUR ACT!!!

On Saturday, April 9 from 2:30pm until 4:30pm we invite you to come and start rehearsing for our Broadway Revue. If you love showtunes and you like to sing in the chorus, we will learn numbers like "Oklahoma" from Oklahoma, "O Bless the Lord, My Soul" from Godspell, "Seasons of Love" from Rent, and "Edelweiss" from the Sound of Music. If you'd like to give your regards to Broadway by singing a solo or a duet, that would be great too!

We'll hold auditions for solos after our rehearsal on the same day.

Performances will be Friday, May 6 and Saturday, May 7, 2011: 7pm andSunday, May 8: Lunch at 1:30pm, show at 2:30pm
Tickets: $10 in advance for Friday, Saturday and Sunday (performance only); $12 at door; $18 for lunch and performance on Sunday.
All proceeds benefit Trinity's Music and Arts Committee.
Contact Peg Gerns (610.253.0792 orgernsp@gmail.com) or Dale Grandield (kitharede@gmail.com or 484.892-7659.)

Tell all of your showtunes-lovin' friends!


20 + 1 + 1 = Renewal

[From Mother Laura Howell, Trinity Bethlehem]

Beginning on Ash Wednesday, we will challenge ourselves to pray for 20 minutes each day, to spend one hour a week in worship, and to serve others for one day each month.

Prayer can take whatever form you prefer.  What is important is not HOW you pray, but THAT you pray.  While we hope that you will worship at your home parish, if you are traveling, experiment by visiting another faith community.   Service can be done one whole day a month, or a few hours at a time.  There are always people and organizations who need our assistance--we only have to let ourselves be aware of them.

Anyone, young or old, can participate.  As a way to get started, during the season of Lent, we will post one way to pray or to worship or to serve each day.  Let us know how you are practicing 20 + 1 + 1.

Find the 20 + 1 + 1 blog here.