Diocesan Convention – Registration

Registration for Diocesan Convention is now open on the Diocesan website.  Convention is at the Cathedral Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem on October 10-11.
 
Lay delegates will also need to register online at the Diocesan website. The registration is now open, and they need to reserve hotel rooms as may be needed. Clergy canonically resident and licensed to officiate need to register for Convention online at the Diocesan website and to reserve hotel rooms as may be needed. Again, the registration on the website is now open.
 
Rooms have been reserved for Convention at these hotels:
 
Comfort Suites in Bethlehem
120 West 3rd Street
Bethlehem
610-882-9700
40 rooms held until Oct 5
 
Homewood Suites by Hilton
2031 Avenue C
Bethlehem
610-264-7500
10 rooms held until Sep 19
 
Best Western Plus
300 Gateway Drive
Bethlehem
610-866-5800
10 rooms held until Sep 10
 
The Convention Banquet will be in the Wood Dining Room at Iacocca Hall of Lehigh University on Friday evening, October 10. Iacocca Hall is on the Lehigh University Mountaintop Campus off of Wyandotte Street.
 
If you have any questions, Howard Strinfellow, archdeacon@diobeth.org, or Nanette Smith, nsmith@diobeth.org, will be able to answer them.  Questions about online registration for Convention should be addressed to Rosie Hummel, rhummel@diobeth.org or Kat Lehman, klehman@diobeth.org.
 


Grace in the City: Urban Ministry in the New Normal

Anglican Theological Review
By Patrick Malloy
Professor, General Theological Seminary NYC
Rector, Grace Allentown.

 

The current “great recession” has had an impact on Allentown, Pennsylvania, just as it has on every city in the world. Well before the days of Bernie Madoff and subprime mortgages, though, Allentown and the other cities of the Lehigh Valley were navigating an economic tragedy.

The driver of the Lehigh Valley’s economic fortunes was the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. It was headquartered in a twenty-onestory building, the tallest in the Lehigh Valley by only eight feet, but that was enough to dispel any doubts about who dominated the economy. Its research center and executive dining room sat clearly visible on the highest mountain in the Valley, a looming reminder of the power that controlled the destiny of nearly every person below. And there below, deep in the crevice between the hills, was the plant that produced the steel that made Bethlehem and its neighboring cities thrive. Allentown was one.

The Bethlehem Steel plant was the largest factory in the world, and they say it glowed red in the night and lit up the sky for miles. It is empty now and decrepit except for one small corner that has become a Sands Casino. So grand are the buildings that they are striking even in their rusted decay. The mountaintop building has been absorbed by Lehigh University, and the office building stands dark and empty, towering against a sky no longer bright with the furnaces’ fire. The fate of many who once worked for Bethlehem Steel is like the fate of the company’s real estate. So is the fate of many of their descendants. So, too, is the fate of many of the people who moved into the homes of the workers who made the steel. As they chased faraway jobs, their once grand houses were divided into makeshift apartments, while “outsiders,” who brought with them problems that the Lehigh Valley had never known, resettled the neighborhoods. Center City Allentown, more than any other place in the Lehigh Valley, fell apart.

Download the entire article here.




Maria Tjeltveit named to Allentown Ethics Commission

Canon Maria Tjeltveit, rector of Mediator Allentown and Ecumenical and Interfaith Officer for the Diocese of Bethlhem, was appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by City Council to the five-member Ethics Commission for the City of Allentown. According to the City of Allentown website, the Board of Ethics "is responsible to administer the City's Code of Ethics. This Board was established by ordinance to City Council, where the Mayor appoints its members with the advice and consent of Council. Members meet as often as the Mayor or City Council requests. No more than two people on this Board can be from the same party. (Member Requirements: 5 members; and Term Limits: appointed to 4 year terms)"