Two Poems for Jane Teter – by Gwendolyn-Jane Romeril
newSpin 170518

newSpin 170504

newSpin, the newsletter
May 4, 2017
Bill Lewellis

[A DioBeth newsletter (General or Leadership) or the newSpin newsletter is published online on Thursdays in the following rotation: (1) Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) General News, (4) The newSpin newsletter. If you are not receiving these newsletters by email, be in touch with Paula Lapinski (610-691-5655, paula@diobeth.org). If you find something online or in print(or if you'd like to write something) that you think might warrant inclusion for the sake of many in the newSpin newsletter, please send the link or your text to bill.lewellis@gmail.com]

TopSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]

• DioBeth General News, April 27 … Here •Refugee Ministry: Where is God Calling Us to Respond?, •Evangelism Conference with Bishop Nicholas Knisely, •Standing Committee Asks Prayers for Bishop Search, •Nominations Open for Churchwide Leadership Positions, •Retreat on Benedictine Living, •Interfaith Gathering and Dinner on April 29, •SUMMA Student Theological Debate Society Summer Camp, •eFormation Conference, •News of the Diocese, •People of Bethlehem

•• DioBeth Leadership News, April 13 … Here. •Evangelism Conference with Bishop Nicholas Knisley, •Regional Confirmation on April 23, Christophany Youth Retreat, •Addiction and Recovery Retreat, •eFormation Conference,  •People of Bethlehem, •News of the Diocese, •Upcoming Diocesan Events

• Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows … was ordained and consecrated the eleventh bishop of Indianapolis April 29, making her the first black woman to lead a diocese in the history of the Episcopal Church and the first woman to succeed another woman as diocesan bishop. Read on.

• Episcopal Church releases Becoming Beloved Community guide for racial reconciliation efforts[ENS] Following a year of listening, consulting and reflection, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings and officers of the House of Bishops and House of Deputies are inviting Episcopalians to study and commit to using “Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation and Justice.” Read on. The full document may be read here.

A political can of worms – it could have been worse – that will require hundred of constitutional lawyers[NYTimes, April 4]
President Trump told a gathering of faith leaders in Washington on Thursday that members of the clergy should be allowed to endorse candidates without fear that their churches will lose tax-exempt status. Mr. Trump signed an executive order directing the Internal Revenue Service to avoid cracking down on political activity by religious organizations, making good on a campaign pledge he used to help build support among religious conservatives.

   But the president’s message of support for religious institutions — delivered on the National Day of Prayer — fell far short of what conservative faith leaders were expecting from Mr. Trump and his administration. They were expecting a broadly worded executive order that would free religious institutions from Obama-era regulations intended to protect gays, lesbians and others from discrimination. Such an order could have given religious-based adoption agencies, hospice providers and housing programs that receive federal funds more leeway to refuse to provide services. Read on.

Intersection: Religion, Culture, Politics  [•New item ••Repeat]
• An interview suggests Trump doesn't know what's in his health care bill[Vox, Sarah Kliff, April 30]
President Donald Trump gave a lengthy interview Sunday morning to CBS’s John Dickerson about the Republicans’ health care plan. His responses to basic questions — like what provisions the bill includes or how it would change the health insurance system — suggest he either doesn’t understand how the American Health Care Act works, or doesn’t want to tell the truth about it. Dickerson is the first journalist I have seen grill Trump on what, exactly, is in the Republican plan. He isn’t asking about the politics of the bill and whether it will pass. Rather, he focuses on what are arguably basic questions: What elements are in this bill, and what do you think of them? Trump stumbles. Read on.

• Sanctuary movement 2.0
[ReligionLink, May 2] President Trump’s immigration policies — the proposed building of a border wall, the crackdown on undocumented workers — have prompted a revival of the sanctuary movement of the 1980s. After his election, organizers reported a near doubling in the number of congregations involved, and the movement has broadened beyond its original Christian and Jewish participants to include Muslim communities as well. This edition of ReligionLink includes trends in the “new sanctuary movement” reporters should watch, as well as sources, background and more. Read on.

•• Los Angeles Times series of editorials on President Trump1. Our Dishonest President,  2. Why Trump Lies,  3. Trump's Authoritarian Vision,  4. Trump's War on Journalism,  5. Conspiracy Theorist in Chief,  6. California Fights Back.  Read here.

• Reverend Resistance
[Esquire]
The Rev. William Barber II is the face of a progressive Christian protest movement that's taking its fight from North Carolina to the White House. Read on.

SpiritSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• How the light gets in: Leonard Cohen's biblical vision
[Commonweal, Christian Raab, April 27] On Saturday November 12, 2016, Saturday Night Live began more soberly than usual. Cast member Kate McKinnon, in character as Hillary Clinton, sang a sincere and haunting version of Leonard Cohen’s most well-known song “Halleluiah.” It was a striking way for SNL to honor both the life and work of Cohen, the Canadian poet and singer-songwriter who had died two nights earlier, and Clinton, who had just lost the United States presidential election. SNL used Cohen as a soundtrack to a political moment. It made sense to do so. Because of his recent death, many people, including myself, were already listening to Cohen on repeat while thinking about the state of affairs in America. The lyrics of “Halleluiah”—especially lines like “even though it all went wrong, I’ll stand before the Lord of song, with nothing on my tongue but Halleluiah”—were well suited to an audience that needed to express the pain of loss, but who also needed to be discouraged from becoming embittered or politically paralyzed. Accordingly, “Halleluiah” served as the perfect overture to McKinnon’s final words to introduce the telecast: “I’m not giving up, and neither should you.”
   In a secular age, artists are often the closest thing we have to prophets. Leil Leibovitz’s A Broken Halleluiah (W. W. Norton) argues that the work of Leonard Cohen is, in fact, best understood and appreciated in the Old Testament prophetic tradition. Leibovitz is not reaching. Cohen was raised in an observant Jewish home and was the grandson on both sides of rabbis of considerable renown. Even if Cohen, like many famous people, often failed to be a paragon of private virtue (his womanizing and drug abuse, especially during his early career, are well established), spiritual concerns nevertheless framed his life and art. The language and imagery of his lyrics came from a biblically formed imagination. His personal faith, as he reaffirmed many times, was in the God of the Torah, and his flashes of prophetic genius were his insights into the application of biblical logic to the contemporary world. If, like many of his peers in rock stardom, he often failed to live at the center of righteousness, he, unlike most of them, maintained a sense of where that center remained, and of how to find it again in prayer and repentance. Read on.


• The Book of Common Prayer ... every edition from 1549 to 1979. Here.
• Prayers and Thanksgivings from the BCP ... Here.
• The (Online) Book of Common Prayer ... Here.
• The Daily Office ... can be read online in Rite I, Rite II or the New Zealand Prayer Book versions. At Mission St. Clare.
• The Daily Office ... from the Diocese of Indianapolis. Here.
• The Prayer Site ... a resource of Forward Movement. Here.
• Speaking to the Soul ... Episcopal Café blog. Sermons, reflections, multimedia meditations and excerpts from books on spirituality. Here.

• Spirit Resources
 ... way below.

Columns, Sermons, Reflections, other Spin [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Acting-as-if in trust and hope[Bill Lewellis, The Morning Call, April 29] I served with the late bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem, Mark Dyer, who used to advise people in the depths of their spiritual dryness to “act as if you believed.” Everyone experiences doubts about the faith at times, said Pope Francis. He did, many times – but such doubts can be “a sign that we want to know God better and more deeply. One who does not ask questions cannot progress either in knowledge or in faith.”

   Letters made public years after the death in 1997 of Mother Teresa revealed that this “living saint” spent nearly 50 years without feeling God’s presence, “neither in her heart or in the eucharist."
   Because I have experienced doubts, dryness and spiritual crises, and continue to do so, even at 80, I find comfort in such admissions from people I admire. Read on in The Morning Call or the newSpin blog.

•• Match your Myers-Briggs type to a patron saint[WaPo] Here.

DioBeth [• New item  •• Repeat]
A DioBeth newsletter (General or Leadership) or this newSpin newsletteris published online on Thursdays in the following rotation: (1) Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) General News, (4) The newSpin newsletter. If you are not receiving these newsletters by email, be in touch with Paula Lapinski (610-691-5655, paula@diobeth.org). If you find something online or in print(or if you'd like to write something) that you think might warrant inclusion for the sake of many in the newSpin newsletter, please send the link or your text to bill.lewellis@gmail.com

• Refugee Ministry: Where is God calling us to respond
[Diocese of Bethlehem]
Allentown is home to refugees from Eritrea, Syria, Iraq, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burma (Myanmar), who speak Arabic, Kiswahili and multiple Burmese dialects. The Refugee Community Center at Church of the Mediator in Allentown is among the leading organizations responding to their needs. The center, which grew out of an Arabic-English book drive in 2015, offers free community dinners, English as a Second Language classes, discussion groups and prayer. It is both a hub and catalyst for other activities. Read on.

• DioBeth General News, April 27 … Here.
• The newSpin Newsletter, April 20 … Here.
• DioBeth Leadership News, April 13 … Here.

DioBeth Parish and Agency Websites

• Allentown: Episcopal HouseHere.
• Allentown: Grace
Here.
• Allentown: Grace Montessori SchoolHere.
• Allentown: MediatorHere. Refugee Community CenterHere.
• Allentown/Bethlehem: St. AndrewHere.
• Athens: TrinityHere.
• Bethlehem: Nativity CathedralHere. Emergency ShelterHere.
• Bethlehem: New Bethany MinistriesHere.
• Bethlehem: TrinityHere.
• Bethlehem: Trinity Soup KitchenHere.
• Carbondale: St. James-St. GeorgeHere.
• Clarks Summit/Glenburn: EpiphanyHere.
• Dallas: Prince of Peace … Here.
• Douglassville: St. GabrielHere.
• Easton: TrinityHere.  ARK Soup Kitchen … Here.
• Emmaus: St. MargaretHere.
• Forest City: Christ ChurchHere.
• Hazleton: St. PeterHere.
• Hamlin: St. JohnHere.
• Hellertown: St. GeorgeHere.
• Honesdale: GraceHere.
• Jermyn: St. James/St. GeorgeHere.
• Jim Thorpe: St. Mark/St. JohnHere.
• Kingston: GraceHere.
• Lebanon: St. LukeHere.
• Lehighton: All SaintsHere.
• Milford: Good ShepherdHere.
• Montrose: St. PaulHere.
• Morgantown: St. ThomasHere.
• Moscow: St. MarkHere.
• Mountain Top: St. Martin-in-the-FieldsHere.
• Mount Pocono:Here.
• Nanticoke/Alden Station: St. AndrewHere.
• Nazareth: St. BrigidHere.
• Palmerton: St. JohnHere.
• Pen Argyl: St. JosephHere.
• Pottsville: TrinityHere.
• Reading: Christ ChurchHereSPARKHere.
• Reading: St. Mary:Here.
• Sayre: Redeemer:Here.
• Schuylkill County: North Parish … Here.
• Scranton: St. Luke:Here.
• Sinking Spring: St. AlbanHere.
• Stroudsburg: Christ ChurchHere.
• Towanda: Christ Church … Here.
• Trexlertown: St. AnneHere.
• Tunkhannock: St. PeterHere.
• Whitehall: St. StephenHere.
• Whitehall: St. Stephen SchoolHere.
• Wilkes-Barre: St. Clement/St. PeterHere.
• Wilkes-Barre: St. StephenHere.
• West Pittston: TrinityHere.

• Wind Gap: St. Mary
Here.
[Bill] Please let me know if your website is not listed above. Also, let me know if you would like me to highlight something on your site. Please note, also, that a few of the websites need to be updated. Thanks.]

Episcopal/Anglican [• New item  •• Repeat]
• The trendy way faith leaders are saving the homeless [Kelsey Dallas, Deseret News, April 28] The Rev. Connie Pearson-Campbell calls it a "God moment." She says divine influence put Ralph Johnson in her path last summer. She'd been at the city offices to learn whether building codes in Bozeman, Montana, allowed for tiny homes, residences generally smaller than 400 square feet. She thought the trendy spaces could fill a gap in the city's anti-homelessness efforts.
  
Johnson, an architecture professor at Montana State University, was in meetings about potential student projects. A city engineer sent one of his aides to catch the Rev. Pearson-Campbell before she left the building, telling her and Johnson they might be able to help one another. "Right then and there, the collaboration was born," said the Rev. Pearson-Campbell, a deacon at St. James Episcopal Church.

   In the nine months since that chance encounter, the pair have launched a broad community effort they hope will address chronic homelessness. Along with Bozeman's Human Resource Development Council, a nonprofit that addresses homelessness in the city, they've planned and begun collecting donations for Housing First Village, a tiny-home development that will include dozens of single-occupant units, a traditional warming shelter and a resource center providing health care checkups, counseling and other social services. Read on.

•• Weekly bulletin inserts … provide information about the history, music, liturgy, mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church. Current inserts here. To view the archive of bulletin inserts dating back to 2006, please visit here. CHECK

• Resources … way below.

Evangelism/Stewardship/Church Growth  [• New item  •• Repeat]
•• Evangelism resources … from the Episcopal Church. Here.

• Resources

... way below

In the Media  [• New item  •• Repeat]

TaleSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• The man to blame for our culture of fame[Jon Meacham, NYTimes Book Review, April 18]
It’s gone now, replaced by a small, unobtrusive park, but in the middle of the 20th century the Stork Club, on East 53rd Street in Midtown Manhattan, was the center of an emerging national culture of celebrity. As Daniel J. Boorstin wrote in his landmark 1961 book The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Event in America, fame, which had once been based largely on achievement or on high birth, was becoming more a matter of “a person who is known for his well-knownness.” And the Stork Club was the temple of the high priest of this new cult of fame for fame’s sake, the columnist and broadcaster Walter Winchell, who presided over a mélange of stars, athletes, politicians and the merely notable from the club’s Table 50.
   In Winchell’s reporting, “The death of ten thousand people in Ethiopia was followed immediately by a Hollywood divorce or romance,” Neal Gabler wrote in his brilliant 1994 biography Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Culture of Celebrity. “Dozens of these items raced past listeners each program, not only abutting one another but most given the same urgency and drama. Nothing was differentiated.” Winchell’s reach was enormous. One listener recalled “strolling one Sabbath evening for six blocks through a residential section of Birmingham [Alabama] and never losing a word of W.W.’s broadcast as his voice came through a succession of open windows.” Read on.

• Woody Allen's Annie Hall … turned 40 a few weeks ago. Do you remember this? “The food at this place is really terrible, and such small portions.”

• Redeem the Times: A remembrance of Dan Berrigan[NCR, Art Laffin] Throughout history the Word of God has been powerfully revealed through the prophets. One such prophet has been Daniel Berrigan, who called the nation away from idolatry and war making to God's way of nonviolence, justice and peace. April 30 marked the first anniversary of the death of Dan, renowned Jesuit priest, peacemaker, and poet. He and his brother, Philip, who died in 2002, were prophets of peace and nonviolent resisters who made many sacrifices and endured long imprisonment for speaking truth to power, and for calling the nation and church to follow the nonviolent Jesus. Read on.

• The founding mothers of U.S. Mother's Day were West Virginia Methodists[United Methodist News Service] The celebration of Mother's Day can be traced back to ancient Greece, but the mother of Mother's Day in the United States was Ann Marie Reeves Jarvis, a Methodist from West Virginia. Her daughter, Anna, led a successful campaign in the early 1900s to have Mother's Day recognized as a national holiday. Read on.


Requiescant in pace  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Robert Spillman, 86 … noted architect and civic leader, died May 1 in St. Luke's Hospital where he was born in 1931. He was an active member of Nativity Cathedral. He served as president of Spillman Farmer Architects from 1982 until his retirement in 1996. Obituary here.

• Two poems for Jane Teter
… by Gwendolyn-Jane Romeril. Here.

• Jane Snyder, 90… died April 29. She was a member of St. Stephen's Whitehall. Obituary here.

• Eileen O'Neil, 91 … died Dec. 22. She was a member of St. Mary's Reading where she served as a lector, chalicer and a member of the vestry. Obituary.

• Jonathan Demme, 73
the Oscar-winning filmmaker who observed emphatically American characters with a discerning eye, a social conscience and a rock ’n’ roll heart, achieving especially wide acclaim with “The Silence of the Lambs” and “Philadelphia,” died April 26 at his home in Manhattan. Read on.

• Cousin Bobby … Demme directed a 1992 documentary, Cousin Bobby, about his cousin Robert Castle, a white Episcopal priest who had served an inner-city church in Harlem for many years, and who died in 2012 at 83. Castle was fairly conventional at an earlier stage of his life. Then came the 1960s and social upheaval, and, for him, a crucial and influential friendship with Isaiah Rowley, a Black Panther leader in Jersey City, N.J. At a time when the Panthers were feared and hated, Castle found Rowley to be a natural leader, sane and inspirational, and gradually the white priest was drawn into circles that were alarming to many members of his congregation. He was once the speaker at an AIDS Memorial held at Nativity Cathedral in Bethlehem. Castle obituary.

“the food at this place is really terrible, and such small portions”

Read more: http://forward.com/culture/369625/what-is-annie-halls-most-jewish-scen

“the food at this place is really terrible, and such small portions”

Read more: http://forward.com/culture/369625/what-is-annie-halls-most-jewish-scene/

Alfred was a member of Saint Barnabas Episcopal Church, Kutztown, where he served as an usher. He was a former member of Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church,

Allentown, where he was a choir member.

- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/readingeagle/obituary.aspx?n=alfred-hand&pid=185027568&fhid=9587&eid=sp_ommatch#sthash.jsMH82ND.dpuf

[Rectors, senior wardens or family members who would like the death of a parishioner noted here may point me to published obits, or send their own brief notice. Thanks.]

Ecumenism, Interfaith, Pluralism – or Not [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Khan Academy … a tour through five major world religions.  • Buddhism,  • Christianity,  • Hinduism,  • Islam,  • Judaism.
  

• Khan Academy … an introduction to the Protestant Reformation.

Evangelical Lutheran Church
• ELCA website
... Here.

ELCA News Service ... Here
• ELCA's blogs may be found here. See especially "Web and Multimedia Development."
• Spirit Spinning ... for those who hunger and thirst for a deeper connection with God ... Here.

Moravian Church
• Moravian Church in North America
  website.  

• Moravian Church Northern Province website
• Moravian Theological Seminary website.

United Methodist Church
• Methodist high court rejects first openly gay bishop's consecration [NYTimes, Laurie Goodstein, April 28] The United Methodist Church’s highest court has ruled that the consecration of its first openly gay bishop violated church law, compounding a bitter rift over homosexuality that has brought the 13-million-member denomination to the brink of schism. In a 6-to-3 vote, the church’s Judicial Council found that a married lesbian bishop and those who consecrated her were in violation of their “commitment to abide by and uphold the church’s definition of marriage and stance on homosexuality.” Still, the court ruled that the bishop, Karen P. Oliveto of Denver, “remains in good standing” pending further proceedings, offering her supporters a glimmer of hope. But it also raised the prospect of a suspension or forced retirement. Read on.


• News Service
Here.

• Communication Resources ... Start here.
• Eastern PA Conference website  Here.
• Facebook Here.
• Bishop Peggy Johnson's blog Here.

Presbyterian Church USA
• Website
... Here.

• News & Announcements ... Here.

Roman Catholic

• Catholic theology owes John Noonan a debt of gratitude [NCR, Charles Curran, April 27]  The opening sentence of The New York Times' obituary of Judge John Noonan provides an excellent illustration of what a topic sentence should be. "John T. Noonan Jr., a federal judge and polymath who defied ideological pigeonholing on profound issues like assisted suicide, the death penalty, civil liberties and illegal immigration" died on April 17 at age 90. As a judge on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals for 30 years, Noonan wrote 10,080 opinions. As a polymath, his primary area of academic interest was history, but his subjects included jurisprudence, philosophy, theology and canon law. Few people have ever achieved such academic prominence in so many different fields. Read on. See also Homage to a Christian Humanist by Kenneth Woodward in First Things.

• Diocese of Allentown ... Here.
• Diocese of Scranton ... Here.

• United States Conference of Catholic Bishops ... Here
• Catholic News Service ... Here.


The Vatican
• Vatican Information Service blog
... Here.
• Vatican News/Info Portal ... Here.

Health and Wellness [• New item  •• Repeat]
Machines will soon[NYTimes] be able to smell when you’re sick. Perhaps a three- to five-year time frame before such tools are available, one biomedical engineer said.

• Resources
… below

Media/Print/Films/TV/Music/Tech [• New item  •• Repeat]
M
ary, Offred and the frightening lessons of 'The Handmaid's Tale'[America, Eloise Blondiau, April 28] In Margaret Atwood’s hellish, futuristic novel, The Handmaid's Tale, which is the basis of a new television series of the same name on Hulu, the handmaid is a woman named Offred. Offred is one of many women separated from her family and enlisted to bear children for the ruling classes of a theocratic state. In Atwood’s dystopia, the handmaid must embody the one-dimensional caricature of Mary who has sometimes been used to restrict women’s roles: a walking womb; bounteous, quiet, complacent. Read on.

• Commonweal Spring Books[May 5 issue] Read it here.

• Spirituality that makes sense [America, Nicholas King SJ, May 2] As the world goes quietly (or noisily) mad, there is an increasing thirst detectable, especially among the young, for a spirituality that makes sense. This remarkable book, The Virgin Eye, which should be read slowly and contemplatively, offers just the thing. Several chapters need to be read more than once, not because they are difficult but because they run deep. This book, published after the author’s death, is a distillation of a life-long pursuit of wisdom. Although Robin Daniels was a Christian and he became a Catholic at almost the very end, his book can be read by anyone engaged in the search for spiritual integrity. Though he speaks of “mindfulness,” there is nothing here of being trendy for the sake of being with the trend. Rather, he acknowledges and shares spiritual wisdom wherever he finds it. One instance is the author’s ability to use poetry over an impressively wide range, aiming not to impress us with his erudition but using these lines to make exactly the point he wishes to make. Read on.

• 80 Books x 2[Esquire] Our list of 80 Books Every Man Should Read,
published several years ago, was rightfully called out for its lack of diversity in both authors and titles. So we invited eight female literary powerhouses to help us create a new list, 80 Books Every Person Should Read.

• Paterson … [First Things]
Every year, at least one film gains widespread acclaim but, for whatever reason, never takes off at the box office. One example is last year’s Paterson, which passed by so quickly that even many regular moviegoers missed it. Now that it’s available on DVD, viewers have another chance to discover one of the most enjoyable and quietly moving pictures in years. Written and directed by Jim Jarmusch and starring Adam Driver, Paterson is about a bus driver who works and lives in Paterson, New Jersey—and who happens to be named Paterson. That may sound like a gimmick, but Paterson is far more than that, thanks to its marvelous cast and Jarmusch’s refusal to play by Hollywood’s rules. In Paterson, there are no explosions, betrayals, tragedies, or graphic depictions of violence or sex—just enchanting scenes that celebrate the beauties of everyday life. Read on.

Websites, Podcasts and Blogs [•New item  •• Repeat]
• The Episcopal Café
Here.
• AnglicansOnlineHere.
• Diocese of BethlehemHere.
• The Episcopal ChurchHere.

Varia

 

******************
newSpin? … I decided years ago to call this newsletter and its related blog newSpin. The "S" in the middle suggests that some items are newS; others, Spin; others, both. Items I include as well as how and how often I present them are clues to my leanings. I think all of us spin. There's a lot more spin in the world of news than most editors own up to. Watch out for that upper case S in the middle. Matthew, Mark, Luke, John and Paul might be said to have spun "the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God" [Mark 1:1]. We continue to spin that good news, as we experience and dance with the Risen Lord.
   The newSpin newsletter is uploaded to the newSpin blog and posted on a newSpin list of some 2,000 addresses every other Thursday. Many recipients forward it to others. It comes, of course, with some spin from the editor. The views expressed, implied or inferred in items or links contained in the newsletter or the blog do not represent the official view of the Diocese of Bethlehem unless expressed by or forwarded from the Bishop, the Standing Committee or the Archdeacon as an official communication. Comments are welcome on Bethlehem Episcopalians (if you have joined that interactive FaceBook group).

Bill Lewellis, Diocese of Bethlehem, retired
Communication Minister/Editor (1986-2010), Canon Theologian (1998-)
Blog, Email (c)610-393-1833
Be attentive. Be intelligent. Be reasonable. Be responsible.
Be in Love. And, if necessary, change. [Bernard Lonergan]


Resources

DioBeth
• Look online every Thursday for a Diocese of Bethlehem newsletter or for newSpin … Every Thursday in the following rotation: (1) The Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) The General News, (4) The newSpin newsletter. The Leadership News and the General News are official publications of the Diocese of Bethlehem. They include news, info, features and events relating to our diocese and parishes. The newSpin newsletter you are now reading is not an official publication – and will usually not duplicate news, info and features relating to our diocese and parish as found in the official newsletters. It is a relatively lengthy eclectic sampling of items related to religion – at times not, at times not so clearly – that the editor thinks readers might find to be of interest. It has been a kind of hobby of a onetime communication minister, the work of a volunteer who in retirement enjoys and dedicates time to do the research required. The newSpin newsletter is always posted on the newSpin blog. If you wish to receive it by email, please send a note to rebecca@canticleccommunications.com

• Look online … for the Diocese of Bethlehem Facebook Page, Facebook Group (Bethlehem Episcopalians) and Twitter feed.

• Bethlehem Episcopalians … is a Facebook group for conversations about mission, spirituality, Christian formation, and more that has replaced the old Bakery email list. Bethlehem Episcopalians is an open group. Anyone can join and items that you post can be shared by group members on their own Facebook pages. This offers each of us the opportunity to reach a larger audience with news and conversations about what God is doing in our diocese." Join the Facebook group. Includes more than 400 members.

DioBeth website
Stumbling into the Sacred ... [Reflections on seeing God in the everyday by Canon Anne E. Kitch]
newSpin blog ... including the newSpin weekly by Bill Lewellis.
Facebook Page  … Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem
Facebook Group … Bethlehem Episcopalians
Twitter
Flickr
YouTube
Vimeo
LinkedIn

Center for Congregations ... The "Using Resources" series of publications by the Center for Congregations is designed to help congregations make the most effective use of capital funds, consultants, architects, contractors, books, congregation management software, and more.
Congregational Consulting ...  More information on how to contact the consultants can be found here and at http://www.congregationalconsulting.org/ .
• Church locators ... Here.
• ECF Vital Practices ... Here.
The Chalice, a publication created by Joan DeAcetis for older adults and caretakers. Download issues here.
• Weekly Bulletin Inserts from the Episcopal Church ... Here.
• Calendar of events in our parishes ... Here.

Episcopal/Anglican
• The Episcopal Church website, news service, news service blog,
Episcopal Café
• AngicansOnline website and news centre.
The Living Church
• The Anglican Communion website and news service.
• The Daily Scan: Contact publicaffairs@episcopalchurch.org to add subscribers for news releases, notices, statements, or Daily Scan.
• Free weekly bulletin inserts provide information about the history, music, liturgy, mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church. Find the inserts here.
Updated Episcopal Church canons and constitution ... Here.
• Forward Movement ... Here.
• Episcopal Web Radio ... Here.
• Episcopal Church Event Calendar ... Here

Ecumenical/Interfaith Relations

Franklin Graham had a revelation. On Friday, Graham said it has “dawned” on him on how to “fight the tide of moral decay that is being crammed down our throats by big business, the media, and the gay & lesbian community.”

His solution: stop doing business with LGBT-friendly companies.

- See more at: http://elielcruz.religionnews.com/2015/06/07/franklin-graham-calls-on-christians-to-blacklist-lgbt-friendly-companies/?email=blewellis%40diobeth.org#sthash.WI32aUeD.dpuf

SpiritSpin
• The Book of Common Prayer ... every edition from 1549 to 1979. Here.
• Prayers and Thanksgivings from the BCP ... Here.
• The (Online) Book of Common Prayer ... Here.
• The Daily Office ... can be read online in Rite I, Rite II or the New Zealand Prayer Book versions. At Mission St. Clare.
• The Daily Office ... from the Diocese of Indianapolis. Here.
• The Prayer Site ... a resource of Forward Movement. Here.
• Speaking to the Soul ... Episcopal Café blog. Sermons, reflections, multimedia meditations and excerpts from books on spirituality. Here.
• The Imitation of Christ ... Available free online.

Evangelism/Stewardship/Church Growth
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.

• EpiscopalShare ... Here.

Bible&Worship
• The Lectionary ... A collection of Lectionary resources for the Episcopal Church, updated Sunday night. Here.
• Lectionary Page ... A liturgical calendar for upcoming weeks, with links to readings from the Revised Common Lectionary (RCL), as adapted for use in Episcopal worship. Here.
• Revised Common Lectionary ... Here.
• The Liturgical Calendar ... BCP, Lesser Feasts and Fasts, HWHM ... Here.
• Oremus Bible Browser ... Here.
• Celebrating the Eucharist, by Patrick Malloy. Google Book
• Enriching our Worship, 1 to 5 ... Free download here.
• The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant: Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Sex Relationships [Extracted from Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing] Here.
• Collection of worship resources at Diobeth.org ... Including Diocesan Cycles of Prayer for weekly worship, Holy Women Holy Men, and The Text This Week. Here.

Health and Wellness
• Resources for caregivers ... Here.
• Medline Plus ... Here
• WebMD ... Here.
• Alzheimers.gov ... For people helping people with Alzheimers. Here.
• Three Free Apps for getting qualified medical advice... [Techlicious] Urgent Care, HealthTap and First Aid. Info and links.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Center for Disease Control - Healthy Living
Church Health Reader

Eastern Pennsylvania Faith Community Nurses
Episcopal Mental Illness Network
Go4Life from the National Institute on Aging at NIH

National Episcopal Health Ministries
NEHM Wellness Resource Page 

Let's Move

News/info/commentary
• Religion News Service Daily Roundup ... here.
• Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project: Daily Religion Headlines ... here.
• Religious Freedom Blog ... a weekly look back at the top stories and developments on religious liberty around the world. Here.
• National Catholic Reporter ... here.
• BBC News Online ... here.
• BBC Religion & Ethics ... here.
• Faith in Public Life ... Here.
• Religion&Ethics News Weekly (PBS) ... Here.
• Religion Research Hub ... ARDA, Association of Religion Data Archives, an especially useful site.
• Back issues of the newSpin newsletter ... here.

Media/Film/TV/Books/Podcasts/Music/Tech
• Spirituality & Film ... Here.
• Spirituality on DVD ... Here.
• Books for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Audios for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Free eBooks by Project Gutenberg  ... Here
• Free Audiobooks from LibriVox ... Here
• Free Audiobooks and eBooks ... Here and Here.
• Google Books ... Millions of books you can preview or read free. Here
• The Online Books Page ... from UPenn. Here.
• More free eBooks  and Audiobooks ... [Techlicious] Here.
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told about your congregation, it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.
• Communicate … Your Ministry, including Bill's Communication Biases and Communication-Evangelism. Here.

Varia
• Insights into Religion ... Here.
• The Alban Institute ... Here.

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