Communicate … Your Ministry
newSpin 151001

newSpin 150917

newSpin, the newsletter
September 17, 2015
Bill Lewellis


[This strange word
… Years ago, when I decided to call this newsletter and its related blog newSpin, I had a few thoughts in mind. The "S" in the middle suggests that some items in newSpin are newS; others, Spin; others, both. Which items the editor includes as well as how and how often he presents them are a clue to his leanings. I think all of us spin. There's a lot more spin in the world of news than most editors own up to. Watch out for that upper case S. Matthew, Mark, Luke, John and Paul might be said to have spun "the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God" [Mark 1:1]. We continue to spin that good news, according to how we have experienced and danced with the Risen Lord. Thanks, Bill]

TopSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• 2015 Convention of the Diocese of Bethlehem … October 2-3. Read on. The convention will include Eucharist (Friday, 5:15 at the Cathedral) and a banquet (Friday, 7:00 p.m. at the Best Western) in remembrance of the ministry of the late Bishop Mark Dyer in the Diocese of Bethlehem (1982-1995). Archdeacon Rick Cluett will preach at Eucharist. Both events are open to anyone. You can register here.


• Pope Francis to arrive in the U.S. on Tuesday for a five-day visit
[Rolling Stone] Taking on climate change, poverty and conservative U.S. clerics. Read on.  [The Nation] How he came to embrace not just climate justice but liberation theology …  Here[RNS, David Gibson] What some papal pundits get wrong about the polls — and why … Francis recently told an interviewer: “Jesus also, for a certain time, was very popular, and look at how that turned out.”  Read on[Crux, Michael O'Loughlin] The ability to capture hearts and minds makes this papacy novel … Here
[New York Magazine, Paul Vallely] The wily political strategy of Pope Francis. Counterbalancing his meetings with world leaders is a classic Francis move and a potent embodiment of his global agenda … Read on[RNS] The quotable Pope Francis. He has a way with words. Here.  [RNS] Look for a 'Francis effect' at the voting booth, not in the pews. After any pope visits the U.S., pollsters try to measure his impact by tracking Catholic Mass attendance.
That may be the wrong place to look. Instead,  the voting booth may indicate a “Francis effect” — signs Catholics are considering the pope in their political decisions, according to a new survey from Faith in Public Life released Wednesday (Sept. 16). Read on.  [RNS] Pope Francis' rapturous welcome belies a historic anti-Catholic past. Through most of U.S. history, native-born white Protestants nursed an intense distrust for Catholics, who tended to be of immigrant stock. Along with the stubborn conviction that a succession of popes planned to topple the American experiment in self-government and impose the Catholic faith upon the entire population, this ethnic distrust formed the core of anti-Catholicism. For example: In Philadelphia, where upward of a million people are expected to fill the streets for an open-air Mass that Francis will celebrate, the story line was quite different in the 19th century. Back then, nativists burned Catholic churches and urged mobs to defend themselves from “the bloody hand of the pope.” Read on[Patheos] Implications, Collaborations, ChallengesHere.

• Anglican Communion to discuss looser global ties … [Reuters] (Reuters) The Archbishop of Canterbury has called a January meeting of leading bishops to discuss loosening the Anglican Church’s global structure due to growing differences over homosexuality and female bishops.
The Anglican Communion, the world’s third largest Christian body with 80 million members, has been split between the more liberal churches of North America and Britain, where women are now allowed to become bishops and same sex couples can marry, and their more conservative counterparts in Africa.Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury who is spiritual leader of the Communion, will propose to the 38 national church heads that communion be reorganized as a group of churches all formally linked to Canterbury but no longer necessarily to each other. In a more decentralized Communion, different congregations around the world would be able to hold different views without any common Anglican doctrine. Read on. There's a better story by Sarah Pulliam Bailey and Michelle Boorstein at WaPo. Also, "Dissolving the Communion to save it," at The Atlantic.

• Presiding Bishop’s statement on refugees; congregational and individual response suggestionsHere.

• Pope calls on Europe's Catholics to take in refugees[WaPo, Anthony Faiola and Michael Birnbaum] Issuing a broad appeal to Europe’s Catholics, Pope Francis on called on “every” parish, religious community, monastery and sanctuary to take in one refugee family — an appeal that, if honored, would offer shelter to tens of thousands. Francis delivered his call as thousands of asylum-seekers detained for days in Hungary streamed into Germany and Austria, and as a small but rising number of volunteers were offering to take some in. But although the pope’s appeal was greeted with applause in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City, some Germans were asking how far their country could go in receiving more refugees.
   The pope, who has thrust himself into polarizing debates over climate change and free-market economics, has again entered the fray, this time over how Europe should handle its largest wave of refugees since the Balkan wars of the 1990s. The majority of those coming are Muslims from Syria, Iraq and other nations, and Francis weighed in as anti-migrant politicians, including senior European leaders, were wielding religion as a weapon. Viktor Orban, the prime minister of Hungary, where Roman Catholicism is the largest religion, last week proclaimed that what he called Europe’s Christian identity is under threat because “those arriving have been raised in another religion, and represent a radically different culture.”
Read on.

• Pope bluntly warns religious orders: Take in refugees or pay property taxes[Crux, John Allen] On the eve of a trip to the United States, Pope Francis has called himself a “son of immigrants” and confirmed the point by issuing a blunt warning to any religious orders in Europe that spurn his recent call to open their doors to refugees because they want to make money off their properties instead. Go ahead, the pope said, but be ready to pay taxes just like everybody else. …
   Reprising a familiar theme, Francis talked about his preference for a “bruised” Church to a “stale” one. “If somebody has a room in his house which is closed for long periods, it develops humidity, and a bad smell. If a church, a parish, a diocese, or an institute lives closed in on itself, it grows ill and we are left with a scrawny Church, with strict rules, no creativity,” he said. “On the contrary – if it goes forth – if a church and a parish go out into the world, then once outside they might suffer the same fate as anybody else who goes out: have an accident. Well in that case, between a sick and a bruised Church, I prefer the bruised, because at least it went into the street.” Read on.

• The EU migrant and refugee  crisis … [theSkimm]  is still a crisis. Hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees are fleeing places like the Mideast and Africa in search of better lives in the EU. Problem is, a lot of EU countries don’t have the resources to be good hosts. Which might be why Hungary’s been building a fence to keep people out. And yesterday (Sept 15), it detained dozens of migrants trying to enter from neighbor Serbia. Meanwhile, the EU’s proposed a plan that would redistribute migrants across its member countries. But it’s tough to get everyone to vote ‘yay’ on it. Next week, leaders are having an SOS meeting to talk options.

• Americans & the Needs of Strangers[Commonweal, E.J. Dionne Jr.] Why should the United States take in tens of thousands of Syrian refugees? There's a simple answer: it's in keeping with who we are, and because we remain a nation that can afford it. Read on.

• Geography of Poverty: A journey through forgotten America[MSNBC] Poverty manifests itself in many ways — poor health care, substandard education, rugged housing, bad diet. But one of its often overlooked consequences is the harsh toll on the body exacted by the geopolitics of poverty, the lucrative energy industry and environmental hazards. As Trymaine Lee examines in this striking piece, the wheezing, coughing, burning eyes and early deaths in Louisiana’s so-called Cancer Alley are a direct result of the legacy of institutional, inescapable poverty that dates to the Antebellum South.This is SOUTHEAST, part two of MSNBC‘s four-part series, Geography of Poverty. INTRODUCTION. SOUTHWEST. NORTHEAST. NORTHWEST.

DioBeth [• New item  •• Repeat] 
•• ECW Project 2015 …The Diocesan Episcopal Church Women (ECW) presents a new fund raising project for parishes to participate in prior to Diocesan Convention in October.  The Diocesan ECW will raise money for scholarships for girls in primary schools and young women in secondary school in our partner Diocese of Kajo Keji.

   The scholarships are: $30/girl/year and $325/young woman/year.Any amount will be welcome.  Checks should be made out to the Diocese of Bethlehem and mailed to:  Diocesan House, 333 Wyandotte St,  Bethlehem PA  18015, Attention:  Deacon Charlie Barebo. Designation for the disbursement of money should be written in the memo line.  Questions may be directed to Diocesan ECW President Dorothy Shaw at (570) 836-2049.  

• Spiritual Writing Class for Spiritual Growth[Scott Allen]  At St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Allentown/Bethlehem. Fall 2015 (Monday Evenings 7-9 PM, Oct 5, 19, Nov 2, 16, Fellowship Hall) Writing can be a tool for spiritual growth. In this four-session class, participants will be writing spontaneously using ‘writing prompts, ’ such as answering questions, finishing a sentence, or responding to Scripture and evocative quotations from spiritual poets and writers. In the first class, we’ll be ‘mining our treasure,’ to see what our life may be saying to us beneath its busyness, struggle and change. In the second and third sessions, we’ll respond to the spiritual prose, poetry and writings of contemporary spiritual writers for insights into our own lives. In the final gathering, we’ll write pieces of our own stories. Sharing what you’ve written by reading it aloud will be optional. Confidentiality shall be respected. Paper will be provided, or bring your own favorite writing pad. Please contact Jo-Ellen Darling to register at mysticpizza4@hotmail.com

• DioBeth Leadership News, August 27,
including a letter from the audit committee, diocesan convention news, complying with the new PA child protection laws, Christian formation consultations, resources and reminders … Here

• Diocesan e-Newsletter, Sept. 10,
including Diocesan Convention info, Diocesan Convention nominations and resolutions, Hugh O'Doherty who will speak at Diocesan Convention, Leadership Training for Ministry Days, resources and reminders … Here

• Look online … for the Diocese of Bethlehem Facebook Page, Facebook Group (Bethlehem Episcopalians) and Twitter feed.

• Bethlehem Episcopalians … is a Facebook group for conversations about mission, spirituality, Christian formation, and more that has replaced the old Bakery email list. Bethlehem Episcopalians is an open group. Anyone can join and items that you post can be shared by group members on their own Facebook pages. This offers each of us the opportunity to reach a larger audience with news and conversations about what God is doing in our diocese." Join the Facebook group, which, as of September 3, includes 322 members.

• Every Thursday: Look online for a Diocese of Bethlehem newsletter
[Bill] One or another newsletter is published every Thursday in the following order: (1) The Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) The Diocesan e-Newsletter, (4) The newSpin newsletter.

   The Leadership News and the Diocesan e-Newsletter are official publications of the Diocese of Bethlehem. They include news, info, features and events relating to our diocese and parishes. Find the most recent Diocesan e-Newsletter, August 13, here. Find the most recent Leadership News, August 27, here.
   The newSpin newsletter you are now reading is not an official publication – and will usually not duplicate news, info and features relating to our diocese and parishes found in the official newsletters. It is a relatively lengthy eclectic sampling of items related to religion – at times not, at times not so clearly – that the editor thinks readers might find to be of interest. It has been a kind of hobby of a onetime communication minister, the work of a volunteer who in retirement enjoys and dedicates time to do the research required. I always post the newSpin newsletter on the newSpin blog. If you wish to receive it by email, please send a note to Jo Trepagnier, jo@diobeth.org.

Episcopal/Anglican [• New item  •• Repeat] 
• Former Episcopal bishop Heather Elizabeth Cook … pleaded guilty September 8 to automobile manslaughter, DWI, leaving scene and texting while driving related to the December drunken-driving death of a bicyclist in North Baltimore. Read on here and here.

•• General Convention 2015 summary of actionsHere.

• Resources … way below.

SpiritSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Colbert and Biden: Faith sees best in the dark[Sarah Condon, Mlckingbird] As a kid I always had a hard time understanding why we went to church. I didn’t grow up in the classic Mississippi religious household. There was no family Bible that got cracked open for weekly devotional time. My parents didn’t quote scripture as a means of parenting us. And I never saw a single cross hung on a wall. By all accounts, we looked fairly agnostic.But we went to church at 8am every single Sunday morning. I remember being around my friend’s mothers who would talk about salvation or the virtue of growing into Godly womanhood and it felt like I was talking to aliens. So one day I asked my Mom why I had to be pushed out of bed Sunday after Sunday into a quiet Episcopal church. And she said simply: Because we want you to have something to fall back on when life gets hard.
  
At the time, I thought that was the lamest excuse ever for church attendance. It sounded needy. Wasn’t I going to church because it made God happy? Wasn’t this all about me learning not to sleep around/use drugs/talk back? Weren’t we going to church so we could tell people who didn’t that they were bound to end up in hell? Besides, how did she know my life was going to be hard?I thought of this short but powerful conversation when I saw the interview Stephen Colbert did with Vice President Joe Biden. Whatever your politics may be, there is something incredibly moving about these two men, who have experienced such profound personal tragedy, softly speaking to one another about how faith has carried them through suffering. Read on and View.


• What really matters at the end of life[TED]
At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? For many, it’s simply comfort, respect, love. BJ Miller is a palliative care physician at Zen Hospice Project who thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. View.  Also, The four stories we tell ourselves about death … [TED] Philosopher Stephen Cave begins with a dark but compelling question: When did you first realize you were going to die? And even more interesting: Why do we humans so often resist the inevitability of death? Cave explores four narratives — common across civilizations — that we tell ourselves "in order to help us manage the terror of death." ViewAnd then: I am Resurrection and I am Life, says the Lord. Whoever has faith in me shall have life, even though he die. And everyone who has life, and has committed himself to me in faith, shall not die for ever. And then: Give rest, O Christ, to your servants with your saints, where sorrow and pain are no more, neither sighing, but life everlasting.

• Spirit Resources
 ... way below.

Columns, Sermons, Reflections and other Spin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Texting can help families talk[WSJournal, "The Ten Point" by Gerard Baker] Teens’ texting habits have often been blamed for interfering with family life, but some experts say text messages can make it more peaceful. Our Work & Family columnist Sue Shellenbarger looks at how texting can help parents communicate with their children. One expert points out that the playful nature of texting makes it a good channel for parental warmth and encouragement. Texts can also help teens gain the self-control they need to express themselves, especially while conveying bad news. It is important, however, not to miss out on what a teen’s body language and expressions can communicate. And keep in mind that messages can be forwarded by friends or read by anyone.


By Amy Butler

Church leadership experts offer plenty of recommendations for those of us crazy enough to take on the challenge of trying to help churches move into the future. I sit in these conference meetings and listen. I read the books they recommend. I know the concepts they propose, but do I act them out in real life?

Not so much.

Change is hard, friends. And as much as I’d like to say I regularly employ these strategies, I recently realized how far from their regular use I am.

- See more at: https://baptistnews.com/opinion/columns/item/30360-choosing-adaptive-change#sthash.3BDI4Xqs.dpuf
Nothing says, “I have no idea what I’m talking about” like a pastor, blogger, or social media troll complaining about “journalistic integrity.” Those who use this phrase are typically not saying anything about journalism; they just don’t like what the writer has to say. How do I know this? Because I’ve met more than my share of them and, when pressed, they cannot even define the word “journalism.”

Upon receiving this criticism, I usually respond with twin questions:

  1. How do you define “journalism?”
  2. What are the standards of “journalism” that you think are required for it to have integrity?

With rare exception, the critic has no answer—not even a bad one—to either question. Instead of doing the hard work of defining terms they seek to use, the individual has mindlessly commandeered a phrase that they’ve heard someone somewhere (probably on a cable news network) use and invoked it to hopefully cast doubt on the writer’s credibility.

- See more at: http://jonathanmerritt.religionnews.com/2015/07/28/brothers-and-sisters-you-are-not-professional-journalists/#sthash.CBfnwTO4.dpuf

Where Religion, Culture and Politics Might Intersect  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Public schools shouldn't preach – but they should teach kids about religion … [WaPo] If we want kids to understand their world, they need to know the basics about different faith traditions, Linda K. Wertheimer says. Read on

• Joe Biden bares his soul to Stephen Colbert[The Daily Beast] It was less a news-making interview with a prominent public official than a display of the sort of easy authenticity that at least one of Biden’s potential rivals finds it exceedingly difficult to master. Read on.

Evangelism/Stewardship/Worship/Church Growth  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Excellence in opera or saving a life? Your choice
… [WaPo, In Theory, Peter Singer of Princeton] Many Americans give to charity, but few do any research on the charities to which they give. Much of that is what psychologists call “warm glow” giving — when people who are comfortably off give $10 or $20 to a charity, it’s more likely because it makes them feel better than because they are serious about helping the charity’s cause.Meeting social expectations drives another segment of giving. We respond to what our church, mosque or synagogue expects from us, or to what our college friends tell us they are giving to the alma mater. If someone we love died from breast cancer, most people will nod approvingly if we buy a pink ribbon. Few will ask how much money is already going to breast cancer research or whether our donation would be more worthwhile if directed elsewhere.
  
Today, effective altruists are asking these tough questions. We should, they say, give to the charity that will do the most good with our dollars. But some people balk at that idea. With so many different causes, how can we say which does the most good? Is it even possible to compare the different benefits we might bring about, when our donations could go to charities with objectives as varied as preventing diseases such as malaria that sicken and kill millions of children in developing countries, reducing the suffering of animals, helping the homeless in our local communities or building a new opera house?Many people think that we can’t argue about our fundamental values. In the language of the day, it just depends on your “passion.” But passion is a poor guide. Anti-vaccinators can be just as passionate as people working for human rights. Read on.

• Resources
 ... way below

In the Media  [• New item  •• Repeat]

Rest in Peace   [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Henry Acres, 89 … onetime senior warden at the Allentown Church of the Mediator. Obituary here.


TaleSpin [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Cult: An organized group of people, religious or not, with whom you disagree[Pacific Standard, Ted Scheinman] "Cult" is a dangerous word. It is volatile and subjective and does not admit easy distinctions. Given its connotative breadth, it may be the most ambivalent monosyllable in the language, compassing the followers of such eschatological icons as Charles Manson, David Koresh, and Jim Jones—but also Beliebers, devotees of the Tower of Power, and most people who do CrossFit. “But”—you're asking—“do I belong to a cult?” To which American media says, probably, yes …
  
Everyone partakes in some manner of formalized enthusiasm and is equally zealous in deriding whatever collective enthusiasms he does not share. Or: Man's capacity for credence is exceeded only by his disdain for the creeds of others. Hugh Rawson captures this irony in his 1995 Dictionary of Euphemisms and Other Doubletalk: Being a Compilation of Linguistic Fig Leaves and Verbal Flourishes for Artful Users of the English Language: “Cult. An organized group of people, religious or not, with whom you disagree.” …
  
In the most serious sense of the word, cults can beget rape, slavery, and mass murder. In the most frivolous sense, cults are everywhere, and we all belong to one. This series of essays investigates cultish notions, from the terrifying to the trivial—the possibilities of collaborative worship, and the perils of blind enthusiasm. Read on.

BackSpin – Do you remember? [• New item  •• Repeat]

Employment Opportunities [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Episcopal Positions beyond DioBeth ... Here.

Ecumenism, Interfaith, Pluralism – or Not [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Resources … way below.

Evangelical Lutheran Church
• Syrian refugees will find homes in Lehigh Valley[The Morning Call] Allentown’s Lutheran Children and Family Service program helps 39, will welcome more. Read on.

ELCA website ... Here.

ELCA News Service ... Here
ELCA's blogs may be found here. See especially "Web and Multimedia Development."
Spirit Spinning ... for those who hunger and thirst for a deeper connection with God ... Here.

Moravian Church
Moravian Church in North America  website.  
Moravian Church Northern Province website
Moravian Theological Seminary website.

United Methodist Church
News Service Here.
Communication Resources ... Start here.
Eastern PA Conference website  Here.
Facebook Here.
Bishop Peggy Johnson's blog Here.

Presbyterian Church USA
Website ... Here.
News & Announcements ... Here.

Roman Catholic [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Diocese of Allentown ... Here.

• Diocese of Scranton ... Here.
•• A diminishing number of active priests[Times-Tribune, Scranton] to minister to the spiritual needs of the nearly 280,000 Roman Catholics in Northeast Pennsylvania in the coming years will require the Diocese of Scranton to embrace other forms of pastoral leadership.As the diocese takes this next step in its evolution, with deacons, other religious or laypeople filling non-sacramental roles previously filled almost solely by priests, there will be implications for how the local church engages the laity and how parishioners approach and live out their faith … A decade ago, the Diocese of Scranton had 228 priests in active ministry across its 11 counties. Today, there are 137. At the same time, the number of parishes without a priest in residence has grown from five in 2005 to 14 in 2015 even as mergers have trimmed the overall number of parishes from 189 to 120, diocesan figures show. In another 10 years, perhaps sooner, the diocese anticipates retirements, illness and other circumstances will thin the pastoral ranks by about 40 active priests, leaving fewer than 100. Read on. See also AP story here.

• United States Conference of Catholic Bishops ... Here
• Catholic News Service ... Here.

 

The Vatican [• New item  •• Repeat]
• What is driving Pope Francis’ canonization of Junípero Serra? … [NCR, Jamie Manson] Here.

• How tarnished is Serra's halo? … [NCR, Vinnie Rotondaro]
Saint-making normally isn't the backdrop for deep cultural battles. Disagreements over the official distribution of halos rarely rise to the level of wide popular interest, and the ceremonies themselves are often celebrations largely for those who have advocated and financed the new saint's cause. Junípero Serra, the 18th-century Franciscan friar who came from Spain to California to evangelize its indigenous population, is another case entirely. It is likely that the adjective "controversial" will long accompany any mention of his canonization, which will occur Sept. 23 at a ceremony celebrated by Pope Francis in Washington, D.C. Strong disagreement exists between those who promote his sainthood and those who oppose it. Read on.

• Vatican website ... Here
• Vatican Information Service blog ... Here.
• Vatican News/Info Portal ... Here.
• The Joy of the Gospel [Evangelii Gaudium] ... Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis, with detailed table of contents. Here.
A readers’ guide to “Laudato Si”[NCR, Thomas Reese, June 26] Chapter-by-chapter guidance with study questions to help in reading Pope Francis' encyclical on climate change. Intended for book clubs, classes and small discussion groups. Read on.

Health and Wellness [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Resources
… below


Media/Print/Films/TV/Music/Tech [• New item  •• Repeat]
• The New Yorker minute … I stumbled upon a weekly newsletter (free, but you must subscribe) for New Yorker fans. The author described it as "your secret weapon against the Three-Foot-Tall Stack Of Unread New Yorkers Sitting In Your Apartment. We tell you what to read each week; you safely recycle the rest without guilt. Goes out Wednesdays. Subscribe here. You do not have to subscribe to the New Yorker to take advantage of this. Here's a note from the most recent minute:
Filter Fish, the last byline Oliver Sacks will ever have in the New Yorker. Oliver Sacks is a global treasure and you should not turn down an opportunity to read him. But if you only have time for one piece, read one of the features from the archive.

• Small Mercies: A Novel
[Commonweal, Tom Deignan] Eddie Joyce's Small Mercies traces the effects that the 9/11 attacks had on the families of workers from Staten Island, the "servants quarters of New York"—where roughly 10 percent of the victims lived. Read on.

• Resources
… below.

VariaSpin [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Nomophobia[theSkimm] What happens when you break out in a cold sweat at your desk after realizing you’ve left your phone at home. It’s called smartphone separation anxiety. And you need help.

******************
The newSpin newsletter is uploaded to the newSpin blog and posted on a newSpin list of some 2,000 addresses every other Thursday. Many recipients forward it to others. It comes, of course, with some spin from the editor. The views expressed, implied or inferred in items or links contained in the newsletter or the blog do not represent the official view of the Diocese of Bethlehem unless expressed by or forwarded from the Bishop, the Standing Committee or the Archdeacon as an official communication. Comments are welcome on Bethlehem Episcopalians (if you have joined that interactive FaceBook group).

Bill Lewellis, Diocese of Bethlehem, retired
Communication Minister/Editor (1986-2010), Canon Theologian (1998-)
Blhog , Email (c)610-393-1833
Be attentive. Be intelligent. Be reasonable. Be responsible.
Be in Love. And, if necessary, change. [Bernard Lonergan]


Resources

DioBeth
• Every Thursday: Look for a Diocese of Bethlehem newsletter … One or another newsletter is published every Thursday in the following order: (1) The Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) The Diocesan e-Newsletter, (4) The newSpin newsletter. The Leadership News and the Diocesan e-Newsletter are official publications of the Diocese of Bethlehem. They include news, info, features and events relating to our diocese and parishes. The newSpin newsletter is not an official publication – and will usually not duplicate news, info and features relating to our diocese and parishes found in the official newsletters. It is a relatively lengthy eclectic sampling of items related to religion – at times not, at times not so clearly – that the editor thinks readers might find to be of interest. It has been a kind of hobby of a onetime communication minister, the work of a volunteer who in retirement enjoys and dedicates time to do the research required. The newSpin newsletter is posted on the newSpin blog. If you wish to receive it by email, please send a note to Jo Trepagnier, jo@diobeth.org.

• Look online … for the Diocese of Bethlehem Facebook Page, Facebook Group (Bethlehem Episcopalians) and Twitter feed.

• Bethlehem Episcopalians … is a new Facebook group for conversations about about what God is doing in our diocese. It was launched a few months, replacing the Bakery email list which has been taken down. Join the Facebook group.

DioBeth website
Stumbling into the Sacred ... [Reflections on seeing God in the everyday by Canon Anne E. Kitch]
newSpin blog ... including the newSpin weekly by Bill Lewellis.
Facebook Page 
Facebook Group … Bethlehem Episcopalians
Twitter
Flickr
YouTube
Vimeo
LinkedIn

Center for Congregations ... The "Using Resources" series of publications by the Center for Congregations is designed to help congregations make the most effective use of capital funds, consultants, architects, contractors, books, congregation management software, and more.
Congregational Consulting ...  More information on how to contact the consultants can be found here and at http://www.congregationalconsulting.org/ .
• Church locators ... Here.
• ECF Vital Practices ... Here.
The Chalice, a publication created by Joan DeAcetis for older adults and caretakers. Download issues here.
• Weekly Bulletin Inserts from the Episcopal Church ... Here.
• Calendar of events in our parishes ... Here.

Episcopal/Anglican
• TREC [TaskForce for Reimagining the Episcopal Church] … website.
• TREC … Video Q&A with TREC panel at Oct. 2, 2014 TREC Churchwide Meeting at the Washington National Cathedral
• The Episcopal Church website, news service, news service blog,
Episcopal Café
• AngicansOnline website and news centre.
The Living Church
• The Anglican Communion website and news service.
• The Daily Scan: Contact publicaffairs@episcopalchurch.org to add subscribers for news releases, notices, statements, or Daily Scan.
• Free weekly bulletin inserts provide information about the history, music, liturgy, mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church. Find the inserts here.
Updated Episcopal Church canons and constitution ... Here.
• Forward Movement ... Here.
• Episcopal Web Radio ... Here.
• Episcopal Church Event Calendar ... Here

Ecumenical/Interfaith Relations

Franklin Graham had a revelation. On Friday, Graham said it has “dawned” on him on how to “fight the tide of moral decay that is being crammed down our throats by big business, the media, and the gay & lesbian community.”

His solution: stop doing business with LGBT-friendly companies.

- See more at: http://elielcruz.religionnews.com/2015/06/07/franklin-graham-calls-on-christians-to-blacklist-lgbt-friendly-companies/?email=blewellis%40diobeth.org#sthash.WI32aUeD.dpuf

SpiritSpin
• The Book of Common Prayer ... every edition from 1549 to 1979. Here.
• Prayers and Thanksgivings from the BCP ... Here.
• The (Online) Book of Common Prayer ... Here.
• The Daily Office ... can be read online in Rite I, Rite II or the New Zealand Prayer Book versions. At Mission St. Clare.
• The Daily Office ... from the Diocese of Indianapolis. Here.
• Daily Prayer ... a resource of Forward Movement. Here.
• Holy Women, Holy Men ... Download Holy Women, Holy Men as a .pdf file.
• Speaking to the Soul ... An Episcopal Café blog. Sermons, reflections, multimedia meditations and excerpts from books on spirituality. Here.
• The Imitation of Christ ... Available free online.

Evangelism/Stewardship/Church Growth
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.

• EpiscopalShare ... Here.

Bible&Worship
• The Lectionary ... A collection of Lectionary resources for the Episcopal Church, updated Sunday night. Here.
• Lectionary Page ... A liturgical calendar for upcoming weeks, with links to readings from the Revised Common Lectionary (RCL), as adapted for use in Episcopal worship. Here.
• Revised Common Lectionary ... Here.
• The Liturgical Calendar ... BCP, Lesser Feasts and Fasts, HWHM ... Here.
• Oremus Bible Browser ... Here.
• Celebrating the Eucharist, by Patrick Malloy. Google Book
• Enriching our Worship, 1 to 5 ... Free download here.
• The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant: Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Sex Relationships [Extracted from Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing] Here.
• Collection of worship resources at Diobeth.org ... Including Diocesan Cycles of Prayer for weekly worship, Holy Women Holy Men, and The Text This Week. Here.

Health and Wellness
• Resources for caregivers ... Here.
• Medline Plus ... Here
• WebMD ... Here.
• Alzheimers.gov ... For people helping people with Alzheimers. Here.
• Three Free Apps for getting qualified medical advice... [Techlicious] Urgent Care, HealthTap and First Aid. Info and links.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Center for Disease Control - Healthy Living
Church Health Reader
Eastern Pennsylvania Faith Community Nurses
Episcopal Mental Illness Network
Go4Life from the National Institute on Aging at NIH
National Episcopal Health Ministries
NEHM Wellness Resource Page 
Let's Move

News/info/commentary
• Religion News Service Daily Roundup ... here.
• Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project: Daily Religion Headlines ... here.
• Religious Freedom Blog ... a weekly look back at the top stories and developments on religious liberty around the world. Here.
• National Catholic Reporter ... here.
• BBC News Online ... here.
• BBC Religion & Ethics ... here.
• Faith in Public Life ... Here.
• Religion&Ethics News Weekly (PBS) ... Here.
• Religion Research Hub ... ARDA, Association of Religion Data Archives, an especially useful site.
• Back issues of the newSpin newsletter ... here.

Media/Film/TV/Books/Podcasts/Music/Tech
• Spirituality & Film ... Here.
• Spirituality on DVD ... Here.
• Books for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Audios for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Free eBooks by Project Gutenberg  ... Here
• Free Audiobooks from LibriVox ... Here
• Free Audiobooks and eBooks ... Here and Here.
• Google Books ... Millions of books you can preview or read free. Here
• The Online Books Page ... from UPenn. Here.
• More free eBooks  and Audiobooks ... [Techlicious] Here.
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told about your congregation, it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.
• Communicate … Your Ministry, including Bill's Communication Biases and Communication-Evangelism. Here.

Varia
• Insights into Religion ... Here.
• The Alban Institute ... Here.

Religious Freedom Recap, our weekly look back at the top stories and developments on religious liberty around the world. - See more at: http://brianpellot.religionnews.com/2013/09/16/burkini-compromise-pope-hearts-atheists-dozen-muslim-march-religious-freedom-recap-sept-9-sept-16/#sthash.nA6J6Y1Y.dpuf

 

 

 

 

 

 

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