newSpin 150723
Trinity Bethlehem seeks Director of Youth Ministries

newSpin 150806

newSpin, the newsletter
August 6, 2015
Bill Lewellis

TopSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]

• August 6: The Transfiguration of Our Lord[Forward Movement] Most of the world was by no means ready for this revelation. Indeed, the first reaction of the three disciples indicated that they had very little comprehension of what Jesus was about. The days ahead would clarify much. Yet, even today we stand before his glory astonished, puzzled, and bungling in our response to him. Change us when we behold your presence, Lord Christ, that we may be ready to take up our cross and follow you. Amen. O God, who on the holy mount revealed to chosen witnesses your well-beloved Son, wonderfully transfigured, in raiment white and glistening: Mercifully grant that we, being delivered from the disquietude of this world, may by faith behold the King in his beauty; who with you, O Father, and you, O Holy Spirit, lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. Read on. Also at Holy Women, Holy Men ... Download HWHM as a .pdf file.

• August 6, 1945: HiroshimaOn August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, killing by some estimates 140,000 people and destroying 90% of the city.. It was the first time that a nuclear weapon was ever used in warfare, and only the second time that a nuclear weapon had ever been exploded. It was dropped over Hiroshima at 8:15 in the morning. It exploded 1,900 feet above the ground. Capt. Robert Lewis watched the explosion from his cockpit and wrote in his journal, "My God, what have we done?" Read on at BBC. Also, at WaPo, what 70 years of reconstruction looks like. Also, see Hiroshima by John Hersey, about an August 1946 article that ran the length of The New Yorker magazine. Also, at Kottke. Also, at WritersAlmanac. Also, at WaPo, what would it look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city? Here.

• Los Alamos[Bill] I recommend The Bomb, a two-hour PBS documentary I watched a few days ago. It's available if you have Roku. I recalled a conversation I had with a woman – from the Cathedral, I think – who told me her father worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, the final link in the Manhattan Project's far flung network. The laboratory designed and fabricated the first atomic bombs. If you are reading this, please jog my memory, bill@diobeth.org.

• August 6, 1965: President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act, one of the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation ever passed in this country. The 15th Amendment to the Constitution, enacted in 1870, prohibited states from denying male citizens the right to vote “based on race, color or previous condition of servitude.” But black voters were still turned away at the polls, told that they were in the wrong place, or that they had missed the election. Some officials insisted on literacy tests, or made would-be voters recite the Constitution. Presidents Kennedy and Eisenhower had been reluctant to get involved in what was seen as a regional issue. And even though Lyndon Johnson believed that the federal government should intervene, he felt that the timing wasn’t right. Read on.

• August 9, 1945: Nagasaki … On August 9, 1945, the United States exploded a nuclear device over Nagasaki, Japan, instantly killing an estimated 39,000 people. The explosion came three days after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Read on at NYTimes.
 
• August 14: Jonathan Myrick Daniels[Forward Movement] In the summer of 1965, Jonathan Daniels, a twenty-six-year-old student at the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Cambridge, Massachusetts, came to Alabama to help reconcile persons of different races and secure basic human and civil rights for black citizens. In Hayneville, Alabama, he and others were jailed for picketing local businesses. They were soon released and, while trying to enter a store to buy a cold soft drink, were confronted by a deputy holding a shotgun. Daniels pushed Ruby Sales, a sixteen-year-old African American, out of harm's way. He was shot and killed. A Roman Catholic priest, Richard Morrisroe, standing nearby, was severely wounded by the same deputy. Years later, Bishop Robert O. Miller of Alabama would say of him, "John was not simply a civil rights worker who happened to be a Christian. He was a person whose mature formation in Christ led him to the prophetic ministry that led him to his death." May we stand ready to lay down our lives for others, especially the defenseless and the outcast. Amen. O God of justice and compassion, you put down the proud and mighty from their place, and lift up the poor and the afflicted: We give you thanks for your faithful witness Jonathan Myrick Daniels, who, in the midst of injustice and violence, risked and gave his life for another; and we pray that we, following his example, may make no peace with oppression; through Jesus Christ the just one, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. Read on. Also at Holy Women, Holy Men ... Download HWHM as a .pdf file.

• Tickets for Bishop Curry's installation
… The Installation of Bishop Michael Bruce Curry as the 27th Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church will be at noon on Sunday, November 1, 2015 (All Saints Day) at the Washington National Cathedral. It will be webcast live. Each Bishop has been allocated one ticket for their personal attendance. In addition, each Bishop may request one additional ticket for their spouse/partner. Information on the process for general seating tickets will be announced after Labor Day.

• First Presbyterian Church of Bethlehem may leave national Presbyterian Church[The Morning Call, August 4, Sarah M. Wojcik] The largest Presbyterian church in the Lehigh Valley has begun a process that could lead to a split from the most visible national denomination — a move initiated after a survey showed most of its congregants disagree with church positions including, those allowing same-sex marriage and the ordination of gay ministers. The leadership of the First Presbyterian Church of Bethlehem voted on June 15 to enter the discernment process to leave Presbyterian Church (USA), or PC (USA), and seek affiliation with ECO: a Covenant Order of Evangelical Presbyterians after spending years considering the move.The 140-year-old church on Center Street in Bethlehem has 2,609 members and would be the largest congregation to leave the Lehigh Presbytery, the group of congregations covering seven counties in eastern Pennsylvania. Read on.

• Ten myths about immigration
[Teaching Tolerance] 1.
Most immigrants are here illegally.  2.It's just as easy to enter the country legally today as it was when my ancestors arrived.  3.There’s a way to enter the country legally for anyone who wants to get in line.  4.My ancestors learned English, but today’s immigrants refuse.  5.Today’s immigrants don’t want to blend in and become “Americanized.”  6.Immigrants take good jobs from Americans.  7.Undocumented immigrants bring crime.  8.Undocumented immigrants don’t pay taxes but still get benefits.  9.The United States is being overrun by immigrants like never before.  10.Anyone who enters the country illegally is a criminal. Read on.

• Boy Scouts of America votes to end controversial ban on openly-gay scout leaders[WaPo, Michelle Boorstein, July 27] The Boy Scouts of America, facing litigation, shrinking membership and sweeping acceptance of gay rights, voted Monday (July 27) to lift its ban on openly gay troop leaders and employees.The national organization will no longer allow discrimination against its paid workers or at BSA-owned facilities. But local troops and councils will be permitted to decide for themselves whether they will allow openly gay volunteer leaders. Read on. Also, by Adelle Banks, at RNS.

• We missed you last Sunday :-)[WaPo, Sarah Pulliam Bailey, July 24] Could Big Brother be coming to a church near you? One software company is now providing churches with facial recognition software to better track who shows up at their worship services. Manually tracking attendance is a chore for some churches, especially large ones that have multiple services and entrances. Now a company called Churchix provides facial recognition software, which captures someone’s face through a photo or video and then identifies it by comparing it with those in a database of photos. Now used by Facebook and dating apps and at traffic stoplights, the software is becoming more common in every day interactions. Read on.

• Prayers of the People and Jubilate Online … The Rev. Canon Cliff Carr, priest associate at Trinity Episcopal Church in Bethlehem, writes Prayers of the People for each week and prepares a list of hymn selections by season. Find those resources on the Trinity Bethlehem website.


• Hasidic girl's uplifting poem [Forward.com] A poem by an 11th grade girl from a Hasidic family in Crown Heights has gone viral on social media, the Forward reports. Read from top to bottom, “Worst Day Ever?” sounds pessimistic. Reread it from the bottom up to find out how she really felt about her day. Here.

• On Social Justice, Francis isn't rethinking so much as recycling[John Allen Jr., Crux, August 4]
As Pope Francis prepares for his trip to the United States next month, there’s been a great deal of attention to a recent dip in his US approval ratings, which most observers link to two developments: His encyclical letter calling for dramatic action to fight global warming and climate change, Laudato Si’, and his fiery anti-capitalist comments during a July trip to Latin America. In that spirit, here’s a quick quiz to test one’s knowledge of traditional papal teaching on both those issues. In each case, there’s a quote followed by a series of multiple choice options as to which pope said it. Read on.

DioBeth [• New item  •• Repeat] 
• DioBeth Leadership News, July 30, including a letter from the audit committee, diocesan convention news, complying with the new PA child protections laws, Christian formation consultations, resources and reminders … Here
•• Diocesan e-Newsletter, July 16
Here

•• Look online … for the Diocese of Bethlehem Facebook Page, Facebook Group (Bethlehem Episcopalians) and Twitter feed.
•• Bethlehem Episcopalians … is a Facebook group for conversations about mission, spirituality, Christian formation, and more. It has replaced the Bakery email list. "Bethlehem Episcopalians is an open group," wrote Archdeacon Rick Cluett, "which means that anyone can join and items that you post can be shared by group members on their own Facebook pages. This offers each of us the opportunity to reach a larger audience with news and conversations about what God is doing in our diocese." Join the Facebook group, which, as of August 4, includes 312 members.

•• Every Thursday: Look online for a Diocese of Bethlehem newsletter
[Bill] One or another newsletter is published every Thursday in the following order: (1) The Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) The Diocesan e-Newsletter, (4) The newSpin newsletter.

   The Leadership News and the Diocesan e-Newsletter are official publications of the Diocese of Bethlehem. They include news, info, features and events relating to our diocese and parishes. Find the most recent Diocesan e-Newsletter, July 16, here. Find the most recent Leadership News, July 30, here.
   The newSpin newsletter is not an official publication – and will usually not duplicate news, info and features relating to our diocese and parishes found in the official newsletters. It is a relatively lengthy eclectic sampling of items related to religion – at times not, at times not so clearly – that the editor thinks readers might find to be of interest. It has been a kind of hobby of a onetime communication minister, the work of a volunteer who in retirement enjoys and dedicates time to do the research required. I always post the newSpin newsletter on the newSpin blog. If you wish to receive it by email, please send a note to Jo Trepagnier, jo@diobeth.org.

•• Education for Ministry groups[Cathy Bailey] are forming now for meetings to start in September. We have seminar groups meeting in Bethlehem, Whitehall, and Reading. EfM is a 4 year program studying the Old and New Testaments, Christian History and theology. Folks attending EfM have an opportunity to share their learning experiences in small groups of 6-12 using discussions and sharing. There are also opportunities to look at life through the eyes of theology using Theological Reflection tools. These are great ways of helping us to see God in our lives and in the world around us every day. We meet weekly from September through May. Contact Cathy Bailey cbnnp@rcn.com for more information.

The stunning vote of the Irish to legalize same-sex marriage will be taken as one more indication (along with the legalization of divorce and homosexual behavior and abortion if the mother’s life is at risk, plus the decline in Mass attendance and priestly vocations) of the collapse of the Catholic Church in a country where it once bestrode the sod like a colossus. Such would appear to be the wages of a rolling sexual abuse scandal, particularly acute because of the church’s control of public education, and the ugly history of its abusive homes for wayward boys and girls.

But for all that, Ireland remains a country where over 70 percent of the population identifies as Catholic, where a higher proportion of Catholics go to Mass than in the U.S., where the divorce rate is low. And yet, every Irish political party supported the referendum and the citizenry voted in favor by a 62-38 margin. What gives?

- See more at: http://marksilk.religionnews.com/2015/05/23/irish-catholicism-supports-same-sex-marriage/#sthash.c6vMYDqD.dpuf

Episcopal/Anglican [• New item  •• Repeat] 
• The latest information about The Episcopal Church
Subscribe to the Public Affairs Office’s e-mail lists to receive the latest information about The Episcopal Church. Media Releases provides up-to-the-minute information about news, events, and resources from The Episcopal Church. The Daily Scan is a daily list of links to news stories in the mass media that highlight The Episcopal Church, Episcopal parishes and dioceses, and Episcopalians.

•• General Convention wrap-up
[ENS] The 78th General Convention, in a series of historic moments, elected the first African-American presiding bishop; approved marriage equality for all Episcopalians; adopted a budget that emphasizes racial reconciliation and evangelism; endorsed the study of fossil fuel divestment; opposed divestment in Israel, Palestine; and made some significant changes to the church’s governance. Read on.


• Unearthing Jamestown's leaders, and a mystery[NYTimes, Nicholas Fandos, July 28] One man was thought to be the first Anglican minister in the Americas. Another, an early explorer of the Mid-Atlantic region, was a rival of Capt. John Smith’s. And two of them, kin of Sir Thomas West’s, the governor of Virginia, helped save a colony on the brink of collapse. All four, some of European America’s earliest leaders, died in colonial Jamestown from 1608 to 1610 and were long thought lost to history. But on Tuesday, a team of researchers from the National Museum of Natural History and the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation announced that they had unearthed and identified the men amid the ruins of a church on the site of Fort James. The structure is the first Protestant church built in the New World, and the men’s burial there signals their high status in the colony, the researchers said. Read on. Also, at The Atlantic.

• Resources … way below.

SpiritSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Dispositional gratitude … G. K. Chesterton wrote that thanks are the highest form of thought and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder. [Quoted by David Brooks in his recent column about dispositional gratitude.]

• Top 5 regrets of the dying … 1.
I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.  2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.  3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.  4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.  5. I wish that I had let myself be happier. Read on.

• Spirit Resources
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Columns, Sermons, Reflections and other Spin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Today's exhausted superkids[NYTimes Op-Ed, Frank Bruni, July 29]
There are several passages in the new book “Overloaded and Underprepared” that fill me with sadness for American high school students, the most driven of whom are forever in search of a competitive edge. Some use stimulants like Adderall. Some cheat. But the part of the book that somehow got to me most was about sleep. It’s a prerequisite for healthy growth. It’s a linchpin of sanity. Before adulthood, a baseline amount is fundamental and nonnegotiable, or should be. But many teenagers today are so hyped up and stressed out that they’re getting only a fraction of the rest they need. Read on.

• Brothers and sisters, you are not professional journalists[RNS, Jonathan Merritt, July 28]
Nothing says, “I have no idea what I’m talking about” like a pastor, blogger, or social media troll complaining about “journalistic integrity.” Those who use this phrase are typically not saying anything about journalism; they just don’t like what the writer has to say. How do I know this? Because I’ve met more than my share of them and, when pressed, they cannot even define the word “journalism.” Upon receiving this criticism, I usually respond with twin questions: 1. How do you define “journalism?” 2. What are the standards of “journalism” that you think are required for it to have integrity?
   With rare exception, the critic has no answer—not even a bad one—to either question. Instead of doing the hard work of defining terms they seek to use, the individual has mindlessly commandeered a phrase that they’ve heard someone somewhere (probably on a cable news network) use and invoked it to hopefully cast doubt on the writer’s credibility. Read on.
Nothing says, “I have no idea what I’m talking about” like a pastor, blogger, or social media troll complaining about “journalistic integrity.” Those who use this phrase are typically not saying anything about journalism; they just don’t like what the writer has to say. How do I know this? Because I’ve met more than my share of them and, when pressed, they cannot even define the word “journalism.”

Upon receiving this criticism, I usually respond with twin questions:

  1. How do you define “journalism?”
  2. What are the standards of “journalism” that you think are required for it to have integrity?

With rare exception, the critic has no answer—not even a bad one—to either question. Instead of doing the hard work of defining terms they seek to use, the individual has mindlessly commandeered a phrase that they’ve heard someone somewhere (probably on a cable news network) use and invoked it to hopefully cast doubt on the writer’s credibility.

- See more at: http://jonathanmerritt.religionnews.com/2015/07/28/brothers-and-sisters-you-are-not-professional-journalists/#sthash.CBfnwTO4.dpuf

Where Religion, Culture and Politics Might Intersect  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• America's obligation to South Sudan[NYTimes Editorial Board, July 29] There was no way President Obama could travel to East Africa and not make an effort to resolve the tragedy that is South Sudan, though the prospects for a solution are bleak. The country, after all, is America’s foster child: President George W. Bush played a key role in the peace agreement that led to independence from Sudan, and Mr. Obama’s first United Nations ambassador and now national security adviser, Susan Rice, was deeply involved when the people there voted to establish a new state four years ago. Read on.

• White House sets new rules for faith-based grants[USA Today, August 5] The White House is trying to make it easier for religious organizations to participate in federal social service programs, rolling out new rules Wednesday to clarify the requirements to separate the social services from religious practices. Read on.

• Iran deal: it's time for some serious thought[Sojourners, Jim Wallis, July 30]
There’s a new kind of language being used around the Iran nuclear deal recently negotiated in Vienna. We can call it “Trump Talk,” defined as a drumbeat of outrageous political speech that is historically inaccurate, intellectually dishonest and even deceptive, morally and spiritually offensive, and willfully tone deaf … There are about 50 days for Congress to review and vote on whether to accept or reject the Iran nuclear accord. Fifty days to choose diplomacy and peace over a belligerent and habitual rush to war. Making peace is hard work; making peace with enemies requires perseverance, discipline, and firm resolve. It’s time for serious talk — especially from those purporting to lead or run for president. Read on.
• A better way: the achievement of the Iran nuclear deal … [The Editors of Commonweal] It would be a stunning historic mistake if Congress did not seize this opportunity to put Iran to the final test. If Iran cheats, there are strong mechanisms in the agreement that quickly re-impose sanctions. As Obama has argued in explaining the value of negotiating with regimes you don’t trust, both Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon concluded verifiable treaties with much more dangerous foes than Iran. The right-wing hawks strongly opposed those deals as well, insisting that the United States could and should impose its will on our enemies and allies alike simply because of our strength and presumed virtue. The long and tragic series of recent U.S. military failures abroad should remind us that there is a better way. Read on.

• US Catholic bishops take on Donald Trump[Crux, Michael O'Loughlin, August 3] About 41 percent of the US Catholic Church identifies as Hispanic, up 6 points from 2007, according to the Pew Research Center. Read on.

• Commonweal Interviews: 1939-present … Featuring the best of Commonweal magazine interviews—including Woody Allen, Jorge Luis Borges, Mary Gordon, (Sister) Elizabeth McAlister, Christian Wiman, and Mario Cuomo—this reading list spans seventy-six years, five popes, and thirteen U.S. presidents. These conversations cover a wide range of topics and sketch the contours of a complicated American Catholic history in dialogue with secular politics, culture, and views of religion. Read on.

• Russians feel less positive towards religion now than they did in 1990[The Economist, Erasmus, July 31] Over
the quarter-century since the collapse of the Soviet system, Russian feelings about religion have changed a lot, as one might imagine. In Soviet times, the state expected and encouraged citizens to be atheists. Now a loose affiliation to a religious faith has become the national default mode; a plurality of Russians tell pollsters they are Russian Orthodox, while significant minorities identify with Islam, Buddhism or Judaism.
  
But a survey published a few days ago (link in Russian) by one of Russia's best-known pollsters, VTSIOM, showed something unexpected in its comparison of present-day attitudes in Russia with those of 1990. Although there is a jump (from 23% to 55%) in the share of people who say they are sometimes "helped" by religion in their own lives, the general effect of religion on human welfare is viewed in much bleaker terms than before. The proportion of people who think religion does more good than harm to society has slumped from 61% to 36% while the share detecting more harm than good has risen from 5% to 23%.
  
One can guess at least part of what is going on here. In 1990, many Russians saw religion in the same rosy glow in which they saw everything non-Soviet, from rock music to fast food to monarchism. If the Soviet Union had been against it, they were for it—or thought it at least worth a try. Religion seemed daring, different and exotic. The Soviet system did tolerate religious structures, including the Russian Orthodox hierarchy, as long as they were loyal to the state, but they were pretty weak. Since then the visible strength and privilege of officially-blessed faiths (mainly but not only Orthodox Christianity) has grown enormously. Religion is viewed as a partner in power, and not in any sense counter-cultural. Read on.
   [Bill: The Economist allows you to get beyond its paywall for three articles monthly. You can stretch that if you have more than one email address by registering with each address. Easy registration. And you can use your same password for all your addresses.]

• Why anti-immigrant rhetoric is so prolematic [WaPo, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archdiocese of New York] During those happy days decades ago when I taught American religious history to university students, I spent a chunk of time in class on the ugly phenomenon called nativism, defined by the scholar and author Ray Allen Billington as, “organized, white, Protestant antagonism toward the Catholic immigrant.” It flourished in our country during the 1840s and 1850s — actually becoming a popular political party, the Know-Nothings — and appeared again, in the 1870s, as the American Protective Association; in the 1920s, as the KKK; and during post-World War II America, as Protestants and Other Americans United for Separation of Church and State. These nativists believed the immigrant to be dangerous, and that America was better off without them. All these poor degenerates did, according to the nativists, was to dilute the clean, virtuous, upright citizenry of God-fearing true Americans. I made the point to my students that nativism never really did disappear completely, but was a continual virulent strain in the American psyche, which would probably sadly show up again. Read on.

• Wheaton drops student health insurance to avoid Obamacare contraception mandate[RNS, Cathy Lynn Grossman and Reuters, Aug. 2] Wheaton College, an evangelical Christian school in Illinois, will stop providing health insurance to students on Friday because of its objection to the Obamacare mandate to provide contraceptive coverage, a legal group has announced. The decision affects about 500 of 3,000 students at the nondenominational liberal arts school — nicknamed the “evangelical Harvard” — in the Chicago suburb of Wheaton, according to the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a Washington-based legal group that represents the college. Colleges are not required to provide health insurance to students, but the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, requires policies provided by colleges that offer insurance to cover preventive services for women, including access to contraception and sterilization. Read on.

There’s a new kind of language being used around the Iran nuclear deal recently negotiated in Vienna. We can call it “Trump Talk,” defined as a drumbeat of outrageous political speech that is historically inaccurate, intellectually dishonest and even deceptive, morally and spiritually offensive, and willfully tone deaf. - See more at: https://sojo.net/articles/iran-deal-its-time-some-serious-talk#sthash.H69jTf3V.dpuf• Crosses, turbans and maple leaves[The Economist, Erasmus, July 28] Compared with their southern neighbours, Canadians are quite wary of mixing religion and politics. Admittedly, Stephen Harper is probably the nearest thing that Canada has had in recent times to a prime minister from the religious right. He is an evangelical Christian of a strongly pro-Israel persuasion. And he has been accused by some of appealing to Islamophobic sentiment by, for example, telling Muslim women not to wear a face-covering niqab at the ceremony when they receive Canadian citizenship. But even Mr Harper treads warily, knowing how allergic some Canadians are to religious slogans, especially in federal politics. For example, his habit of saying "God bless Canada" will appeal to some voters (Canada faces an election on October 19th) and alienate others. This year, his Canada Day message on July 1st cautiously avoided reference to God; last year he made two such allusions in a Canada Day tweet. Read on.

At its heart, the Greek crisis is about the moral economy, not the financial one. The Eurocrats want the Greeks to admit they are wastrels who deserve to suffer. The Greeks want the Eurocrats to admit they are Scrooges who like making them suffer.

They may both be right, but behind the moral standoff is a difference in approaches to human error that has divided Eastern and Western Christianity for centuries. It’s the difference between the Orthodox idea of economia and the Augustinian conviction that either it’s right or God brings the hammer down.

- See more at: http://marksilk.religionnews.com/2015/07/09/the-moral-theology-of-the-greek-crisis/#sthash.gkayofZc.dpuf

Evangelism/Stewardship/Worship/Church Growth  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Resources
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In the Media  [• New item  •• Repeat]
•• Q&A with Bishop Nick Knisely[WPRI.com] Onetime rector of Trinity Bethlehem, Bishop Nicholas Knisely of the Episcopal Church of Rhode Island spoke with Eyewitness News there in a brief Q&A about the General Convention. Here.

Rest in Peace  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• John Kimble, 78 … The Rev. John Kimble died July 26. John was the rector of St. Michael's, Birdsboro from 1967-72. He was ordained deacon and priest by Bishop Warnecke. After leaving this diocese John had a long ministry in Toledo, OH and then retired to Florida. He is survived by his wife Marilyn, who is the sister of Laura Jones. We join with his family, friends, and parishioners giving thanks to God for his faithful ministry and we pray that God's comforting presence will be with all who mourn.

• Claudia D. McClellan, 68 … a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church of Mount Pocono, died on July 14. Memorial Service at Trinity, August 6 at 6:00 p.m., with interment in the Trinity Memorial Garden. There will be a reception with time for fellowship with Claudia's family following the service in the parish. Obituary.

• Frances Berger, 85 … died on July 11. She was a member of St. John's Episcopal Church in Hamlin and widow of the Rev. James Berger,. Obituary.

• Raymond J. Umlauf, 88 ... a member of St. John's Episcopal Church, North Parish, died on July 14. Obituary.

• Beatrice Ault, 76 … a member of All Saints Episcopal Church Lehighton died on July 14. Obituary.

• Ida D. Heckman, 102 … a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, Pottsville, died on July 12.  Obituary.

• William W. Baum, 88
[Catholic News Service, Mark Zimmerman, July 26] archbishop of Washington, DC from 1973 to 1980, died July 23 after a long illness. He was a cardinal for 39 years — the longest such tenure in US Church history. Baum witnessed history from the Second Vatican Council through the election of the first Latin American pope, and he made history himself. Read on.

• Owen Chadwick, 99[NYTimes, William Grimes, July 23] an educator and prolific historian of Christianity whose works encompassed sweeping narratives, like his two-volume history of the Victorian church, as well as incisive biographies and vivid pictures of rural church life, died on July 17 at his home in Cambridge, England. "The Reformation" (1964), one of two volumes Professor Chadwick wrote for The Penguin History of the Church, was required reading in colleges for decades. Professor Chadwick was an ordained Anglican priest. Read on.

When 22-year-old Clay William Shephard died May 17, 2015, his parents chose to share the story of his drug addiction with the world. Handsome and talented, Clay seemed to have it all; he was known for his broad smile and generous nature. (He spent his time, for instance, volunteering with his father at Carolina Tiger Rescue.) But drugs held a power over him that he couldn't shake. He was able to hide the worst of his addiction from his parents, preventing them from helping him before it was too late. In the obituary they wrote, Shephard's parents offered advice to parents and children alike in an attempt to stop such a tragedy from happening to anyone else: "To all children, this note is a simple reminder that there are people who love you, with everything they have and no matter what you do – don't be too afraid/ashamed/scared, too anything, to ask for help. To all parents, pay attention to your children and the world that revolves around them – even when the surface is calm, the water may be turbulent just beneath." It's one of a growing number of obituaries that spell out the tragic decisions made by loved ones in hopes that they can stop others before it's too late. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/news/in-the-news/the-obituary-as-a-cautionary-tale/3252/#sthash.29YeHL9P.dpuf
TaleSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Rules For A Happy Marriage: 4 Secrets from an Expert[Barking Up the Wrong Tree] 1) Everything You Know About Marriage Is Wrong: Everybody thinks marriage used to be better "back then." Nope. Marriages in the past weren't better. In fact, they weren't even about love. 2) Define What Marriage Means For You And Your Partner: Relations between partners have changed more in the past 30 years than they did in the previous 3,000. So it's okay to be confused. We're changing the rules. 3) You Need To Communicate And Negotiate: You're going to need to talk more. And tell your partner what you want instead of expecting them to know the answers. 4) Marriage Has To Be Based On Friendship And Mutual Respect: Fiery, passionate love is great – but ancient societies had a point: basing a lifelong commitment on those emotions can be unstable. What happens when that burning love fades? So while passion is great, there needs to be friendship and mutual respect to make sure your relationship can stand the test of time. Read on.

•• Is this the end of Christianity in the Middle East?
[NYTimes Magazine, Eliza Griswold, July 22] ISIS and other extremist movements across the region are enslaving, killing and uprooting Christians, with no aid in sight. Most of Iraq’s Christians call themselves Assyrians, Chaldeans or Syriac, different names for a common ethnicity rooted in the Mesopotamian kingdoms that flourished between the Tigris and the Euphrates Rivers thousands of years before Jesus. Christianity arrived during the first century, according to Eusebius, an early church historian who claimed to have translated letters between Jesus and a Mesopotamian king. Tradition holds that Thomas, one of the Twelve Apostles, sent Thaddeus, an early Jewish convert, to Mesopotamia to preach the Gospel. Read on. Bill: Author Eliza Griswold is the daughter of Phoebe Griswold and the 25th Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Frank Griswold. She is the author of The Tenth Parallel: Dispatches From the Fault Line Between Christianity and Islam.

• A millennial named Bush[NYTimes Sunday Review, Nicholas Kristof, Op-Ed, July 25] Barbara Bush, 33, joined her father on a 2003 trip to Africa and was staggered by the human toll of AIDS in Uganda. “That inequity blew my mind,” she recalled.
So she returned to Yale and took health classes, and then quietly took a job (while her father was still in the White House) in a South African hospital, often working with children with AIDS. After her return, she and five friends began brainstorming about how to help recruit more people to global health. Her connections opened doors — she’s frank about that — and they ended up starting Global Health Corps, initially intended as a kind of Teach for America for global health. Bush became chief executive at age 26. Today Global Health Corps is booming. It receives nearly 6,000 applications a year for fewer than 150 positions as fellows. Half of the fellows are American and half foreign, mostly African, and the program gets plenty of praise from health professionals. Barbara Bush acknowledges that her last name has opened doors and helped Global Health Corps expand, and she offers no apologies for her name. “I’m crazy about my family,” she said. “I was very much taught to care about the world.” She has a reputation as the liberal in the family (like her grandmother, also a Barbara), for she has spoken out in favor of gay rights, lives in New York City, and at Global Health Corps has built ties to abortion rights groups like Planned Parenthood Global and Marie Stopes International. Still, she’s wary of being pinned down too much. Read on.

BackSpin – Do you remember?
• Diocesan House Dedication: October 20, 1984 …Buildings on Wyandotte street, near the Cathedral, became available for purchase in 1983. Leonard Hall, the diocesan administrative offices on Delaware Avenue in Bethlehem, had been the headquarters for the Diocese of Bethlehem for more than two decades. When the new property was purchased, Leonard Hall was sold to a group of Bethlehem physicians. From October 1983 to June 1984, diocesan offices were temporarily located in the basement of the cathedral, in an area formerly housing a bowling alley. "The first thing I told the architect," the late Bishop Mark Dyer said in a newspaper interview, "was that [the new Diocesan House] was to be like a home, not an office, and the center should be a place of prayer." Adjacent to the new Diocesan House was a large building at Fourth and Wyandotte, also acquired by the diocese but not yet remodeled. It would soon become New Bethany Ministries. Formerly a bar and lounge, it still had a sign outside, "Open Sundays."

Employment Opportunities
• Episcopal Positions (NYC/DC) ... Here.

Ecumenism, Interfaith, Pluralism – or Not
• What's in a name? Religious nones and the American religious landscape[Religion Dispatches, Richard Flory, July 24] Over the last several years the term religious “Nones” has become a major topic of discussion and analysis by those who pay attention to religious trends. Although the term dates back at least to the 1960s, based on its current usage and popularization, it would appear as though it is a completely new designation for a growing segment of the American population—those who are unaffiliated with any religious group. What has caught everyone’s attention is that there has been a significant and sustained increase in the number of people who are choosing not to identify with any religion. As reported by the Pew Research Center, in 2007, 16 percent of American adults reported no religious preference or affiliation; by 2014 this statistic had increased to almost 23 percent. And younger adults are more likely to say that they have no religion than their parents or grandparents’ generations. Read on.

• The most and least racially diverse U. S. religious groups
[Pew Research FactTank] The nation’s population is growing more racially and ethnically diverse – and so are many of its religious groups, both at the congregational level and among broader Christian traditions.  But a new analysis of data from the 2014 Religious Landscape Study also finds that these levels of diversity vary widely within U.S. religious groups. Read on.

• Major U.S. metropolitan areas differ in their religious profiles … [Pew Research FactTank]
The religious face of America is largely a Christian one, with roughly seven-in-ten Americans belonging to that faith. But some of the nation’s biggest metropolitan areas have a very different look. Only about half of the residents in the Seattle (52%) and San Francisco (48%) metropolitan areas identify as Christians, as well as roughly six-in-ten or fewer of those living in Boston (57%) and New York (59%). Read on.

• Why Mormons are so devastated by the Boy Scout vote on gay leaders[WaPo, Michelle Boorstein, July 28] The Boy Scouts’ vote on July 27 to lift its ban on openly gay troop leaders was a blow to traditional faith groups heavily involved in scouting, but perhaps to none more than the Mormon Church, in which scouting and the religious life of boys are deeply intertwined.Mormons have been deeply invested in Boy Scouts for more than a century, and any boy who goes to a Mormon congregation is automatically part of the Boy Scouts. The rites and rituals of the church are intentionally connected with those of the scouts: As you rise through becoming a deacon, a teacher and then a priest – rites of passage for Mormon teen males – at the same time you rise through scout positions as well. The local bishop selects scoutmasters. Many of the 16 presidents of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints received high scout honors.The Boy Scouts is, literally, the youth program of the Mormon Church for boys, a bond forged because the church saw their core values as the same: Patriotism and devotion to God. The Mormon Church is also the largest Boy Scout charter; about 20 percent of all scouts are Mormon. Read on.

• Mormon Church releases photo of treasured artifact in latest move for greater transparency
… [WaPo, Lindsey Bever, August 5]
The Mormon Church has long been questioned for what outsiders saw as insular ideas and condemned for its early indiscretions. Its dark days date back two centuries to its infancy — a time when it was plagued by polygamy, racism and war.But in recent years, the church has peeled back the curtain on secrets from its seldom talked about heritage in an apparent attempt to clear up common misconceptions about its beliefs and to make the history of the once obscure church more accessible. It has published books containing historical documents, essays and videos to explain its beliefs. Read on.

• Resources
… way below.

Evangelical Lutheran Church
• Lutheran bishop comes out[The Advocate] After decades in the closet, Bishop Kevin Kanouse came out in an emotional sermon to hundreds of young people. –Bishop Kevin Kanouse, head of the Northern Texas-Northern Louisiana area of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, revealed he was gay last weekend to a group of 400 youth and adults … As a young man, Kanouse said he knew of his sexual orientation, but “buried it deep” after hearing antigay slurs and that “homosexuality was a sin” from his conservative upbringing in Pennsylvania. “I learned early on that I had to hide my true nature ... especially because I wanted to be a pastor and serve in the church,” he said. Read on.

ELCA website ... Here.

ELCA News Service ... Here
ELCA's blogs may be found here. See especially "Web and Multimedia Development."
Spirit Spinning ... for those who hunger and thirst for a deeper connection with God ... Here.

Moravian Church
Moravian Church in North America  website.  
Moravian Church Northern Province website
Moravian Theological Seminary website.

United Methodist Church
News Service Here.
Communication Resources ... Start here.
Eastern PA Conference website  Here.
Facebook Here.
Bishop Peggy Johnson's blog Here.

Presbyterian Church USA
• First Presbyterian Church of Bethlehem may leave national Presbyterian Church … See above, under TopSpin.

Website ... Here.

News & Announcements ... Here.

Roman Catholic
• Kenya Catholic bishops call for polio vaccine boycott[RNS, Fredrick Nzwili, July 28]  Nairobi, Kenya. Roman Catholic bishops in Kenya have urged citizens to boycott a mass polio vaccination campaign, unless the safety of the vaccine has been confirmed through scientific tests. The oral vaccination campaign, by the World Health Organization and UNICEF, is scheduled to begin in Kenya on Aug. 1. Ahead of the campaign’s launch, the bishops questioned the safety of the vaccines, saying the manufacturer failed to provide requested information and the government disregarded the bishops’ request for tests. Read on.

• Milwaukee archdiocese to give $21 million to survivors of clergy sex abuse[NCR, Marie Rohde, August 4] The settlement, nearly five years after the archdiocese declared bankruptcy, will go to 330 of the 575 survivors. And a $500,000 therapy fund will be set up and paid for by all of the parishes.
Milwaukee Archbishop Jerome Listecki acknowledged that the projected total legal and professional fees will be about $20 million when the bankruptcy is complete. That does not include the amount Jeff Anderson & Associates, the law firm that represents many of the survivors, will receive … "We applaud the courage of the survivors who came forward and the creditors' committee who fought every step of the way," said Anderson. "The treatment of the survivors by the Archdiocese of Milwaukee has been harsh and hurtful." Read on

• Settlement plan stuns sex abuse victims[NCR, Marie Rohde, August 5] The Milwaukee archdiocese has put forth what it hopes is the final settlement plan that will end the church's nearly 5-year-old bankruptcy case, but victims of childhood sex abuse who filed claims against the archdiocese said they are stunned by the latest proposal. They allege that the $21 million allocated to victims is much smaller than that awarded in other bankruptcies and that it pits victim against victim. Read on.

I once found great comfort in the black-and-white world of apologetics. The Catechism of the Catholic Church provided the answers to all of my questions concerning faith and morals. It was the definitive voice of the church, and I believed everything that vo - See more at: http://www.uscatholic.org/articles/201507/proud-be-cafeteria-catholic-30253#sthash.JW9Ax5dZ.dpuf

• Diocese of Allentown ... Here.
• Diocese of Scranton ... Here.
• United States Conference of Catholic Bishops ... Here
• Catholic News Service ... Here

The Vatican
• The pope's eco-bedfellows[CruxNow, Margery Eagan, Crux, July 27] You don’t always see high hosannas to Catholic popes in The New York Review of Books, a literary intellectual magazine once dubbed the ground zero of Radical Chic. But there’s the headline, in big red letters, on the cover of its August issue: “The Pope & The Planet” (subscription required). The writer is none other than Bill McKibben, one of the nation’s leading — if not the leading — environmentalist. And Laudato Si’, he says, merits the highest of hosannas. It is not just the hugely influential document many in the media have called it. Instead, it moves beyond “a narrow and focused contribution” to the climate debate to become “nothing less than a sweeping, radical and highly persuasive critique of how we inhabit this planet — an ecological critique, yes, but also a moral, social, economic and spiritual commentary. “ Pope Francis claims our very way of understanding human life and activity and our relationship to the earth has “gone awry,” McKibben writes, and completely agrees. The changes required of the world, both argue, are revolutionary. Read on.

• Pope Francis says church must welcome divorced, remarried Catholics[David Gibson, RNS, August 5] Speaking out on one of the most contentious issues of his papacy, Pope Francis on Wednesday (Aug. 5) issued a powerful call for the church to embrace Catholics who have divorced and remarried, telling a gathering at the Vatican that such couples “are not excommunicated, and they absolutely must not be treated that way!”
“They always belong to the church,” he added, calling on pastors to welcome Catholics who have remarried without an annulment, even though such Catholics are currently barred in most cases from receiving the Eucharist, the central sacrament of the faith. “The church is called to be always the open house of the Father. … No closed doors! No closed doors!” Francis told the crowd at his weekly public audience, which resumed after a monthlong summer break. The pope’s words were greeted with what was described as thunderous applause. Since he was elected in 2013, Francis has said that the church must be more merciful and open, and he has encouraged debate on changing pastoral practices to allow, for example, divorced and remarried Catholics to take Communion. Current teaching says such Catholics cannot receive communion unless they abstain from sexual relations because their first marriage is still valid in the eyes of the church. Read on.

• Vatican website ... Here
• Vatican Information Service blog ... Here.
• Vatican News/Info Portal ... Here.
• The Joy of the Gospel [Evangelii Gaudium] ... Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis, with detailed table of contents. Here.
A readers’ guide to “Laudato Si”[NCR, Thomas Reese, June 26] Chapter-by-chapter guidance with study questions to help in reading Pope Francis' encyclical on climate change. Intended for book clubs, classes and small discussion groups. Read on.

Health and Wellness
• Resources … below

BookSpin
• The publication of “Go Set a Watchman” constitutes one of the epic money grabs in the modern history of American publishing[NYTimes Op-Ed, Joe Nocera, July 24] The Ur-fact about Harper Lee is that after publishing her beloved novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird,” in 1960, she not only never published another book; for most of that time she insisted she never would. Until now, that is, when she’s 89, a frail, hearing- and sight-impaired stroke victim living in a nursing home. Perhaps just as important, her sister Alice, Lee’s longtime protector, passed away last November. Her new protector, Tonja Carter, who had worked in Alice Lee’s law office, is the one who brought the “new novel” to HarperCollins’s attention, claiming, conveniently, to have found it shortly before Alice died. Read on.

•• Before C.S.Lewis and J.R.R.Tolkien: The surprising faith of the author behind Alice in Wonderland
[WaPo, Karen Swallow Prior, July 17] The 150th anniversary of “Alice in Wonderland” has been widely celebrated this year, but it is odd, a recent essay at the New Yorker notes, that how seldom the religion of its author, Lewis Carroll, is considered. The scant attention given to Carroll’s Christian faith is particularly striking since he is, in many ways, the direct predecessor of authors C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, who are practically Protestant saints in literary circles. Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll was Dodgson’s pen name) was a committed, lifelong member of the Church of England. Although he balked at taking Holy Orders, he was ordained as a deacon in the church in 1861. Although Dodgson hardly beat his readers over the head with his Christian beliefs, whispers of the glory of God echo throughout his work. Read on.

• Resources
… below.


Media/Films/TV/Music/Tech
• The trailer for Spotlight, the film about the Catholic sex abuse crisis[WaPo, Sarah Pulliam Bailey, July 29] The trailer for the upcoming film “Spotlight,” a film based on the 2002 Boston Globe series investigating abuse in the Catholic Church, has been released. The film is slated to open in theaters Nov. 6, less than two months after Pope Francis will make his first visit to the U.S.The Open Road film, based on the true story behind the Pulitzer Prize-winning series, is directed by Thomas McCarthy and will be shown at the Toronto and Venice Film Festivals in September. It stars Liev Schreiber, Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams, Stanley Tucci and Brian D’Arcy James.“We’ve got two stories here,” Keaton says in the trailer, portraying Walter “Robby” Robinson, editor of the Boston Globe’s investigations unit, a team called Spotlight. “A story about degenerate clergy and a story about a bunch of lawyers turning child abuse into a cottage industry. Which story do you want us to write? Because we’re writing one of them.” Read on.

• The young, conservative American pope[USA Today, July 28] Partnered with the Britain's Sky and France's Canal Plus, HBO has begun production for an eight-episode series, The Young Pope, about the first American pope in history. Diane Keaton plays a nun; Jude Law plays a pope named Larry who's more conservative than probably most of the 266 popes before him. Read on.

• Resources
… below.

VariaSpin
• The vanishing print workforce[Poynter] The American Society of Newspaper Editors reported a 10 percent drop in newsroom jobs in just a year. (Poynter) The figure results from a survey that's inadvertently a sad reflection of the industry's very competence, with a mere 44 percent response rate, compared to 70 percent in prior years. Some editors apparently claimed they couldn't figure out how to account for certain, mostly digital-only jobs. This ain't rocket science guys, figure it out. Meanwhile, one analysis sees mid-sized newspapers as disproportionately hit and caught in a spiral of cost-cutting and declining investment. They may be "toast." (Bloomberg)

• Why two men are walking every block in NYC[Cynical-C] New York City has over 6,000 miles of streets across five boroughs. William Helmreich and Matt Green plan to walk every last block. Though they are doing the same thing, Helmreich and Green have vastly different approaches and reasons for embarking on the journey. In this video, the two men meet for the first time and discuss their philosophies on walking. They ultimately question how—and if—New Yorkers can truly know their city.


Resources

DioBeth
• Every Thursday: Look for a Diocese of Bethlehem newsletter … One or another newsletter is published every Thursday in the following order: (1) The Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) The Diocesan e-Newsletter, (4) The newSpin newsletter.
   The Leadership News and the Diocesan e-Newsletter are official publications of the Diocese of Bethlehem. They include news, info, features and events relating to our diocese and parishes. Find the most recent Diocesan e-Newsletter, June 4, here. Find the most recent Leadership News, May 7, here.
   The newSpin newsletter is not an official publication – and will usually not duplicate news, info and features relating to our diocese and parishes found in the official newsletters. It is a relatively lengthy eclectic sampling of items related to religion – at times not, at times not so clearly – that the editor thinks readers might find to be of interest. It has been a kind of hobby of a onetime communication minister, the work of a volunteer who in retirement enjoys and dedicates time to do the research required. I always post the newSpin newsletter on the newSpin blog. If you wish to receive it by email, please send a note to Jo Trepagnier, jo@diobeth.org.

• Look online … for the Diocese of Bethlehem Facebook Page, Facebook Group (Bethlehem Episcopalians) and Twitter feed.

• Bethlehem Episcopalians … is a new Facebook group for conversations about mission, spirituality, Christian formation, and more. It was launched a few weeks ago and will replace the Bakery email list which has been taken down. "Bethlehem Episcopalians is an open group," wrote Archdeacon Rick Cluett, "which means that anyone can join and items that you post can be shared by group members on their own Facebook pages. This offers each of us the opportunity to reach a larger audience with news and conversations about what God is doing in our diocese." Join the Facebook group.

DioBeth website
Stumbling into the Sacred ... [Reflections on seeing God in the everyday by Canon Anne E. Kitch]
newSpin blog ... including the newSpin weekly by Bill Lewellis.
Facebook Page 
Facebook Group … Bethlehem Episcopalians
Twitter
Flickr
YouTube
Vimeo
LinkedIn

Center for Congregations ... The "Using Resources" series of publications by the Center for Congregations is designed to help congregations make the most effective use of capital funds, consultants, architects, contractors, books, congregation management software, and more.
Congregational Consulting ...  More information on how to contact the consultants can be found here and at http://www.congregationalconsulting.org/ .
• Church locators ... Here.
• ECF Vital Practices ... Here.
The Chalice, a publication created by Joan DeAcetis for older adults and caretakers. Download issues here.
• Weekly Bulletin Inserts from the Episcopal Church ... Here.
• Calendar of events in our parishes ... Here.

Episcopal/Anglican
• TREC [TaskForce for Reimagining the Episcopal Church] … website.
• TREC … Video Q&A with TREC panel at Oct. 2, 2014 TREC Churchwide Meeting at the Washington National Cathedral
• The Episcopal Church website, news service, news service blog,
Episcopal Café
• AngicansOnline website and news centre.
The Living Church
• The Anglican Communion website and news service.
• The Daily Scan: Contact publicaffairs@episcopalchurch.org to add subscribers for news releases, notices, statements, or Daily Scan.
• Free weekly bulletin inserts provide information about the history, music, liturgy, mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church. Find the inserts here.
Updated Episcopal Church canons and constitution ... Here.
• Forward Movement ... Here.
• Episcopal Web Radio ... Here.
• Episcopal Church Event Calendar ... Here

Ecumenical/Interfaith Relations

Franklin Graham had a revelation. On Friday, Graham said it has “dawned” on him on how to “fight the tide of moral decay that is being crammed down our throats by big business, the media, and the gay & lesbian community.”

His solution: stop doing business with LGBT-friendly companies.

- See more at: http://elielcruz.religionnews.com/2015/06/07/franklin-graham-calls-on-christians-to-blacklist-lgbt-friendly-companies/?email=blewellis%40diobeth.org#sthash.WI32aUeD.dpuf

SpiritSpin
• The Book of Common Prayer ... every edition from 1549 to 1979. Here.
• Prayers and Thanksgivings from the BCP ... Here.
• The (Online) Book of Common Prayer ... Here.
• The Daily Office ... can be read online in Rite I, Rite II or the New Zealand Prayer Book versions. At Mission St. Clare.
• The Daily Office ... from the Diocese of Indianapolis. Here.
• Daily Prayer ... a resource of Forward Movement. Here.
• Holy Women, Holy Men ... Download Holy Women, Holy Men as a .pdf file.
• Speaking to the Soul ... An Episcopal Café blog. Sermons, reflections, multimedia meditations and excerpts from books on spirituality. Here.
• The Imitation of Christ ... Available free online.

Evangelism/Stewardship/Church Growth
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.

• EpiscopalShare ... Here.

Bible&Worship
• The Lectionary ... A collection of Lectionary resources for the Episcopal Church, updated Sunday night. Here.
• Lectionary Page ... A liturgical calendar for upcoming weeks, with links to readings from the Revised Common Lectionary (RCL), as adapted for use in Episcopal worship. Here.
• Revised Common Lectionary ... Here.
• The Liturgical Calendar ... BCP, Lesser Feasts and Fasts, HWHM ... Here.
• Oremus Bible Browser ... Here.
• Celebrating the Eucharist, by Patrick Malloy. Google Book
• Enriching our Worship, 1 to 5 ... Free download here.
• The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant: Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Sex Relationships [Extracted from Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing] Here.
• Collection of worship resources at Diobeth.org ... Including Diocesan Cycles of Prayer for weekly worship, Holy Women Holy Men, and The Text This Week. Here.

Health and Wellness
• Resources for caregivers ... Here.
• Medline Plus ... Here
• WebMD ... Here.
• Alzheimers.gov ... For people helping people with Alzheimers. Here.
• Three Free Apps for getting qualified medical advice... [Techlicious] Urgent Care, HealthTap and First Aid. Info and links.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Center for Disease Control - Healthy Living
Church Health Reader

Eastern Pennsylvania Faith Community Nurses
Episcopal Mental Illness Network
Go4Life from the National Institute on Aging at NIH

National Episcopal Health Ministries
NEHM Wellness Resource Page 

Let's Move

News/info/commentary
• Religion News Service Daily Roundup ... here.
• Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project: Daily Religion Headlines ... here.
• Religious Freedom Blog ... a weekly look back at the top stories and developments on religious liberty around the world. Here.
• National Catholic Reporter ... here.
• BBC News Online ... here.
• BBC Religion & Ethics ... here.
• Faith in Public Life ... Here.
• Religion&Ethics News Weekly (PBS) ... Here.
• Religion Research Hub ... ARDA, Association of Religion Data Archives, an especially useful site.
• Back issues of the newSpin newsletter ... here.

Media/Film/TV/Books/Podcasts/Music/Tech
• Spirituality & Film ... Here.
• Spirituality on DVD ... Here.
• Books for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Audios for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Free eBooks by Project Gutenberg  ... Here
• Free Audiobooks from LibriVox ... Here
• Free Audiobooks and eBooks ... Here and Here.
• Google Books ... Millions of books you can preview or read free. Here
• The Online Books Page ... from UPenn. Here.
• More free eBooks  and Audiobooks ... [Techlicious] Here.
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told about your congregation, it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.
• Communicate … Your Ministry, including Bill's Communication Biases and Communication-Evangelism. Here.

Varia
• Insights into Religion ... Here.
• The Alban Institute ... Here.

Religious Freedom Recap, our weekly look back at the top stories and developments on religious liberty around the world. - See more at: http://brianpellot.religionnews.com/2013/09/16/burkini-compromise-pope-hearts-atheists-dozen-muslim-march-religious-freedom-recap-sept-9-sept-16/#sthash.nA6J6Y1Y.dpuf

******************
The newSpin newsletter is uploaded to the newSpin blog and posted on Bakery and on other diocesan lists of some 2,000 addresses. Many recipients forward it to others. It comes, of course, with some spin from the editor. The views expressed, implied or inferred in items or links contained in the newsletter or the blog do not represent the official view of the Diocese of Bethlehem unless expressed by or forwarded from the Bishop, the Standing Committee or the Archdeacon as an official communication. Comments are welcome on Bakery (if you are subscribed to that interactive list) and at the newSpin blog. At the newSpin blog, click in the right hand column on the title of the current newsletter. Then, make your comment below.

Bill Lewellis, Diocese of Bethlehem, retired
Communication Minister/Editor (1986-2010), Canon Theologian (1998-)
Blog , Email (c)610-393-1833
Be attentive. Be intelligent. Be reasonable. Be responsible.
Be in Love. And, if necessary, change. [Bernard Lonergan]

 

 

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