newSpin 150709
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newSpin, the newsletter
July 23, 2015
Bill Lewellis

TopSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Is this the end of Christianity in the Middle East?[NYTimes Magazine, Eliza Griswold, July 22] ISIS and other extremist movements across the region are enslaving, killing and uprooting Christians, with no aid in sight. Most of Iraq’s Christians call themselves Assyrians, Chaldeans or Syriac, different names for a common ethnicity rooted in the Mesopotamian kingdoms that flourished between the Tigris and the Euphrates Rivers thousands of years before Jesus. Christianity arrived during the first century, according to Eusebius, an early church historian who claimed to have translated letters between Jesus and a Mesopotamian king. Tradition holds that Thomas, one of the Twelve Apostles, sent Thaddeus, an early Jewish convert, to Mesopotamia to preach the Gospel. Read on. Bill: Author Eliza Griswold is the daughter of Phoebe Griswold and the 25th Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Frank Griswold. She is the author of The Tenth Parallel: Dispatches From the Fault Line Between Christianity and Islam.

• Sea level may rise much faster than previously predicted
[Kottke] James Hansen, NASA's former top climate scientist, is joined by 16 other leading climate scientists in a paper with some alarming conclusions. The gist is that the glaciers in Antartica and Greenland are melting so much faster than previously predicted that the global sea level will rise more than 10 feet in as little as 50 years, rendering many coastal cities uninhabitable. The thing about nonlinear systems like the Earth's climate is that things happen gradually, then suddenly. This is much more terrifying to me than the Pacific Northwest earthquake. BTW, as a reminder, here's what NYC and the surrounding area looks like with 10 more feet of water. Goodbye JFK Airport. [h/t Dr. Stephen Lewellis]

• US approval rates for Pope Francis slump sharply, led by conservative dismay[RNS, David Gibson, July 22] Growing conservative disaffection with Pope Francis appears to be taking a toll on his once Teflon-grade popularity in the U.S., with a new Gallup poll showing the pontiff’s favorability rating among all Americans dropping to 59 percent from a 76 percent peak early last year. Among conservatives, the drop-off has been especially sharp: Just 45 percent view Francis favorably today, as opposed to 72 percent a year ago. “This decline may be attributable to the pope’s denouncing of ‘the idolatry of money’ and attributing climate change partially to human activity, along with his passionate focus on income inequality — al issues that are at odds with many conservatives’ beliefs,” Gallup analyst Art Swift wrote Wednesday (July 22) when the survey was published. Read on. See also the WaPo story by Michelle Boorstein.

• Emergency Safety Net Effort
Dave and Kathy Leber, longtime members of St. Margaret's Emmaus, are co-founders of an effort (1) to encourage individuals, corporations and foundations to provide emergency funds directly to charitable and religious organizations that are equipped to help folks in emergency situations; (2) to assist a limited number of these organizations directly to help them raise funds from their present and potential donor bases; (3) to promote efforts via their website, other internet facilities and traditional media outlets. This Emergency Safety Net Effort will not accept any funds directly, but will assist donors to select an appropriate charity equipped to handle emergency safety net needs. More info is available at http://www.safetyneteffort.com/ or by calling 888-976-6889. You will notice on the website that Trinity Soup Kitchen in Bethlehem is one of the nonprofits affiliated with this effort.

• What poverty problem? Everyone I know has money [Pacific Standard, Tom Jacobs, July 22] There are good reasons why wealthy people are often reluctant to support policies, and political parties, that aim to distribute wealth more widely. For one thing, it isn't in their short-term self-interest (as their taxes would likely rise). For another, it goes against the conservative ideology many of them hold (which equates poverty with laziness or a lack of moral character). Newly published research has identified yet another, even more basic explanation of why, in spite of the disturbing rise in income inequality, they tend to support the status quo. Their friends and acquaintances tend to inhabit the same economic strata as themselves, so a quick survey of their social circles suggests everything is just fine. Read on.

• Jesus didn't know everything [Pacific Standard, Brandon Ambrosino, July 22] The best Christian argument for marriage equality Is that the Bible got it wrong. Christians need to accept that Jesus was sometimes wrong—in fact, he might even want us to. “Jesus said it, I believe it, that settles it” is a facile mode of Christian logic, and I’d argue that rejecting this logic is actually in line with orthodox Christianity. And I say this as a devout gay Christian who confesses both the divinity of Jesus and the inspiration of the Holy Scriptures. Read on.

DioBeth [• New item  •• Repeat] 
•• DioBeth Leadership News, July 2Here
• Diocesan e-Newsletter, July 16
… Here
•• Look online … for the Diocese of Bethlehem Facebook Page, Facebook Group (Bethlehem Episcopalians) and Twitter feed.
•• Bethlehem Episcopalians … is a Facebook group for conversations about mission, spirituality, Christian formation, and more. It has replaced the Bakery email list. "Bethlehem Episcopalians is an open group," wrote Archdeacon Rick Cluett, "which means that anyone can join and items that you post can be shared by group members on their own Facebook pages. This offers each of us the opportunity to reach a larger audience with news and conversations about what God is doing in our diocese." Join the Facebook group, which, as of July 9, includes nearly 300 members.

•• Look online for a Diocese of Bethlehem newsletter every Thursday
[Bill] One or another newsletter is published every Thursday in the following order: (1) The Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) The Diocesan e-Newsletter, (4) The newSpin newsletter.

   The Leadership News and the Diocesan e-Newsletter are official publications of the Diocese of Bethlehem. They include news, info, features and events relating to our diocese and parishes. Find the most recent Diocesan e-Newsletter, July 16, here. Find the most recent Leadership News, July 2, here.
   The newSpin newsletter is not an official publication – and will usually not duplicate news, info and features relating to our diocese and parishes found in the official newsletters. It is a relatively lengthy eclectic sampling of items related to religion – at times not, at times not so clearly – that the editor thinks readers might find to be of interest. It has been a kind of hobby of a onetime communication minister, the work of a volunteer who in retirement enjoys and dedicates time to do the research required. I always post the newSpin newsletter on the newSpin blog. If you wish to receive it by email, please send a note to Jo Trepagnier, jo@diobeth.org.

•• Education for Ministry groups[Cathy Bailey] are forming now for meetings in September. Groups will be meeting in Bethlehem, Whitehall, and Reading. EfM is a 4 year program studying the Old and New Testaments, Christian History and theology. We meet weekly from September through May. Contact Cathy Bailey cbnnp@rcn.com for more information.

The stunning vote of the Irish to legalize same-sex marriage will be taken as one more indication (along with the legalization of divorce and homosexual behavior and abortion if the mother’s life is at risk, plus the decline in Mass attendance and priestly vocations) of the collapse of the Catholic Church in a country where it once bestrode the sod like a colossus. Such would appear to be the wages of a rolling sexual abuse scandal, particularly acute because of the church’s control of public education, and the ugly history of its abusive homes for wayward boys and girls.

But for all that, Ireland remains a country where over 70 percent of the population identifies as Catholic, where a higher proportion of Catholics go to Mass than in the U.S., where the divorce rate is low. And yet, every Irish political party supported the referendum and the citizenry voted in favor by a 62-38 margin. What gives?

- See more at: http://marksilk.religionnews.com/2015/05/23/irish-catholicism-supports-same-sex-marriage/#sthash.c6vMYDqD.dpuf

Episcopal/Anglican [• New item  •• Repeat] 
•• General Convention wrap-up[ENS] The 78th General Convention, in a series of historic moments, elected the first African-American presiding bishop; approved marriage equality for all Episcopalians; adopted a budget that emphasizes racial reconciliation and evangelism; endorsed the study of fossil fuel divestment; opposed divestment in Israel, Palestine; and made some significant changes to the church’s governance. Read on.

• What difference are women bishops making in the CofE?[BBC, Caroline Wyatt, July 22]
At least six women have now shattered what was known as the "stained glass ceiling" by becoming bishops. The majority are married to other members of the clergy, and one - Alison White - became the first to be married to another bishop, Frank. Christina Rees campaigned for women's ordination during almost a quarter of a century as a lay member of the general synod, the governing body of the Church. Like many, she's thrilled that Rachel Treweek will become the first woman to sit in the House of Lords as part of the Lords Spiritual: a woman on the front bench of the Church."Even though I don't like to stereotype women, I think women hold power more lightly," she says. "They have a better way of working through issues - they're less confrontational. So what I hope is that we'll see a more realistic House of Bishops, more in tune with reality and real people, and one that will be more accessible and a little less distant." Read on.

• God's management consultants: the Church of England turns to bankers for salvation[The Spectator, Mark Greaves, July 18]
A new mood has taken hold of Lambeth Palace. Officials call it urgency; critics say it is panic. The Church of England, the thinking goes, is about to shrink rapidly, even vanish in some areas, unless urgent action is taken. This action, laid out in a flurry of high-level reports, amounts to the biggest institutional shake-up since the 1990s. Red tape is to be cut, processes streamlined, resources optimised. Targets have been set. The Church is ill — and business management is going to cure it.Reformers say they are only removing obstacles that hinder the Church from growing. Opponents, appalled by the business-speak of some of the reports, object to what they see as a ruthless focus on filling pews. Read on.

• Resources … way below.

SpiritSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Introverts can tell us about this … "Language," Paul Tillich wrote, "has created the word loneliness to express the pain of being alone. And it has created the word solitude to express the glory of being alone." [Via Joan D. Chittister, in her book, "Between the Dark and the Daylight: Embracing the Contradictions of Life"]

• Spirit Resources
 ... way below.

Columns, Sermons, Reflections and other Spin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
•• Your sermon? … If you have a sermon you might like uploaded to the newSpin blog and linked to from the newSpin newsletter, point bill.lewellis@gmail.com to it online or send it to him as an attached file.

Where Religion, Culture and Politics Might Intersect  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Why we can applaud the Iran deal in good faith[WaPo Op-Ed, Cardinal McCarrick, July 16 ] What an enormous possibility! Thank God we have not let this chance go by. Read on.

At its heart, the Greek crisis is about the moral economy, not the financial one. The Eurocrats want the Greeks to admit they are wastrels who deserve to suffer. The Greeks want the Eurocrats to admit they are Scrooges who like making them suffer.

They may both be right, but behind the moral standoff is a difference in approaches to human error that has divided Eastern and Western Christianity for centuries. It’s the difference between the Orthodox idea of economia and the Augustinian conviction that either it’s right or God brings the hammer down.

- See more at: http://marksilk.religionnews.com/2015/07/09/the-moral-theology-of-the-greek-crisis/#sthash.gkayofZc.dpuf

Evangelism/Stewardship/Worship/Church Growth  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Resources
 ... way below

In the Media  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Q&A with Bishop Nick Knisely[WPRI.com] Onetime rector of Trinity Bethlehem, Bishop Nicholas Knisely of the Episcopal Church of Rhode Island spoke with Eyewitness News there in a brief Q&A about the General Convention. Here.

Rest in Peace  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• Paul Lioy, 68 … [NYTimes] an environmental scientist widely known for his analysis of the dust spawned by the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and for his studies of its health effects over time, died July 8 after collapsing at Newark Liberty International Airport. Read on.

•• The obituary as a cautionary tale[Legacy.com] When 22-year-old Clay William Shephard died May 17, 2015, his parents chose to share the story of his drug addiction with the world. Handsome and talented, Clay seemed to have it all; he was known for his broad smile and generous nature. (He spent his time, for instance, volunteering with his father at Carolina Tiger Rescue.) But drugs held a power over him that he couldn't shake. He was able to hide the worst of his addiction from his parents, preventing them from helping him before it was too late. In the obituary they wrote, Shephard's parents offered advice to parents and children alike in an attempt to stop such a tragedy from happening to anyone else: "To all children, this note is a simple reminder that there are people who love you, with everything they have and no matter what you do – don't be too afraid/ashamed/scared, too anything, to ask for help. To all parents, pay attention to your children and the world that revolves around them – even when the surface is calm, the water may be turbulent just beneath." It's one of a growing number of obituaries that spell out the tragic decisions made by loved ones in hopes that they can stop others before it's too late. Read on. Also, Obituaries shed euphemisms to chronicle toll of heroin … When George P. Gauthier died of an opiate overdose in May at 44, his sister, Cindy Gauthier-Rivera, wrote an obituary that was more like a cry from the heart. Read on.

When 22-year-old Clay William Shephard died May 17, 2015, his parents chose to share the story of his drug addiction with the world. Handsome and talented, Clay seemed to have it all; he was known for his broad smile and generous nature. (He spent his time, for instance, volunteering with his father at Carolina Tiger Rescue.) But drugs held a power over him that he couldn't shake. He was able to hide the worst of his addiction from his parents, preventing them from helping him before it was too late. In the obituary they wrote, Shephard's parents offered advice to parents and children alike in an attempt to stop such a tragedy from happening to anyone else: "To all children, this note is a simple reminder that there are people who love you, with everything they have and no matter what you do – don't be too afraid/ashamed/scared, too anything, to ask for help. To all parents, pay attention to your children and the world that revolves around them – even when the surface is calm, the water may be turbulent just beneath." It's one of a growing number of obituaries that spell out the tragic decisions made by loved ones in hopes that they can stop others before it's too late. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/news/in-the-news/the-obituary-as-a-cautionary-tale/3252/#sthash.29YeHL9P.dpuf
TaleSpin  [• New item  •• Repeat]
• They tried to bury us. They didn't know we were seeds[HuffPost] Read Bishop Gene Robinson's column to discover the ancient Greek origin of these two sentences and how they continue to be used.

• Higher calling, lower wages: the vanishing of the middle-class clergy
[The Atlantic, July 22] Working two jobs has become so common for clergy members, in fact, that churches and seminaries have a euphemistic term for it: bi-vocational ministry.
Working multiple jobs is nothing new to pastors of small, rural congregations. But many of those pastors never went to seminary and never expected to have a full-time ministerial job in the first place. What’s new is the across-the-board increase in bi-vocational ministry in Protestant denominations both large and small, which has effectively shut down one pathway to a stable—if humble—middle-class career. For example, the Episcopal Church hasreported that the retirement rate of its clergy exceeds the ordination rate by 43 percent. And last year, an article from an official publication of the Presbyterian Church wondered if full-time pastors are becoming an "endangered species." This trend prompted the Religion News Service to report that, in the future, clergy should expect to earn their livings from "secular" jobs. Read on.

BackSpin – Do you remember?
• The Church always loses whenever part of it tries to win [Bill, To David Kalvelage, Editor, The Living Church, Oct. 31. 1990] Dear David, Your article, Bishops Disassociate from Newark Ordination, TLC, Oct. 14, 1990, summarized the 90-minue debate before the 78-74 vote on the resolution submitted by Wiliam Wantland, Bishop of Eau Claire. You quoted Mark Dyer, Bishop of Bethlehem as follows: "I believe the Anglican way of discipline is by compassion, not law. I suggest we do nothing."
   You stopped short of saying that nothing in this instance meant not voting on the Wantland resolution. The October edition of The Episcopal News of Los Angeles caught Dyer's intention and quoted the conclusion of his intervention: "This resolution doesn't help us seek the deepest level of communion with each other."
   Controversy can be approached with a win-lose mindset or with intent to "seek the deepest level of communion." I work l closely enough with Mark Dyer to know that he feels the Church always loses whenever part of it tries to win.
   The bishops miss the apostolic boat when they send messages that being church is mainly about being good (morality) or being right (doctrine) rather than about being one, proclaiming God's Good News, and doing mission. How did Jesus say it? "Seek first the kingdom …"
   "We must be especially boring to God." Dyer wrote last year, "when we care more about being right than about being compassionate. Divisiveness is the result of our obsession with being right. Jesus' prayer for his disciples at the Last Supper was not that they be right. He prayed that they be one."
   He continued, perhaps prophetically: "In God's world, truth is discovered in communion. Though sin may be the foremost obstacle to truth, our lack of will to maintain the highest possible degree of unity with one another –– especially during disagreement –– is sin's enforcer. Truth is rarely served by removing ourselves or excluding others from the table. Only in union will we discern rumors of angels and the Spirit of Truth."
   The bishops would do well to stay at this center and seek first the kingdom, rather than peck at the periphery with messages that ring 78-74 clear. Sincerely, Bill Lewellis, Communication Minister, Diocese of Bethlehem.

Employment Opportunities
• Episcopal Positions (NYC/DC) ... Here.

Ecumenism, Interfaith, Pluralism – or Not
• Franklin Graham's turn toward intolerance[The Atlantic, Jonathan Merritt] One should expect that parents would lose their minds long before their children. But in the case of the famed evangelist Billy Graham’s son, Franklin, it may be the other way around. In a post on his Facebook page this past Friday, the younger Graham proclaimed that all Muslims should be barred from immigrating to America and treated like the Japanese and Germans during World War II. Muslims who come to America have the “potential to be radicalized” and participate in “killing to honor their religion and Muhammad,” he said in response to the murders of four Marines in Chattanooga on Thursday. This is only the latest disturbing comment from Franklin Graham, a man whose rhetoric seems to be growing more extreme and whose behavior seems to be growing more erratic. The son of America’s most prominent evangelist was once known as a leading humanitarian, but he has now traded that legacy for a pot of partisan porridge. Read on.

• Why India’s religious rituals too often end in deadly mass stampedes
[WaPo, July 15, Lindsey Bever] When the gates to India’s Godavari Pushkar Ghat in Rajahmundry in Andhra Pradesh swung open early Tuesday morning, some 5,000 pilgrims rushed in. They were there for a 12-day Hindu religious bathing ceremony called Godavari Maha Pushkaram, convinced a dip in the water would wash away their sins. In the surge of humanity, some pilgrims lost their shoes and, when they fought the crowd to retrieve them, they triggered a deadly stampede — the kind that has devastated the country throughout the years … When the crowd died down, at least 27 people were left dead and more than 60 injured … Such stampedes, particularly at places of pilgrimage, have plagued India for years, so much so that despite the vast number of lives they claim, they receive little notice outside the country. Read onWarning: This story includes graphic images.

• Outspoken Lutheran theologian ousted … [RNS, Lilly Fowler, July 21] Matthew Becker, a leader who questioned the ban on women's ordination and the teaching of creationism, is tossed from the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod. Read on.

• Resources
… way below.

Evangelical Lutheran Church
ELCA website ... Here.
ELCA News Service ... Here
ELCA's blogs may be found here. See especially "Web and Multimedia Development."
Spirit Spinning ... for those who hunger and thirst for a deeper connection with God ... Here.

Moravian Church
Moravian Church in North America  website.  
Moravian Church Northern Province website
Moravian Theological Seminary website.

United Methodist Church
News Service Here.
Communication Resources ... Start here.
Eastern PA Conference website  Here.
Facebook Here.
Bishop Peggy Johnson's blog Here.

Presbyterian Church USA
Website ... Here.
News & Announcements ... Here.

Roman Catholic
• Go beyond a foot-stomping 'no'[NCR Editorial] Reflective of swiftly changing social attitudes and anchored in the language and rationale of civil rights, the U.S. Supreme Court's June 26 decision makes same-sex marriage constitutional throughout the land. In a jolting shift in reality, the court said the term marriage in the civil realm can no longer apply exclusively to heterosexual couples. Over the long arc of human history, the recent acceptance of homosexuality and homosexual unions is easily perceived on one level as a disorienting, even severe, realignment of the social order. In another way, however, this broad new acceptance may be as transformative in its own way of our understanding of something deeply personal and mysterious as recent explorations have been transformative of our understanding, in equally jarring ways, of an infinitely vast and endlessly mystifying universe.
   In each case, old certainties that once comfortably contained our presumptions are shattered. Even those who marvel at or celebrate such new realities might, at the same time, find them unsettling. The Catholic church, which has used some of the most severe language of major denominations in its condemnation of homosexuality, labeling those with a homosexual orientation "intrinsically disordered," is especially challenged by the ruling. At least its leaders are, for it has become clear in recent years that when it comes to believers, Catholics are among the most accepting of homosexuality. In terms of same-sex marriage, according to recent Pew Research polling, "Among Catholics and white mainline Protestants, roughly six-in-ten now express support for same-sex marriage." Read on.

• Pope Francis has chosen social media star Robert Barron for Los Angeles auxiliary bishop[WaPo, Sarah Pulliam Bailey, July 21] Pope Francis has named Chicago priest Robert Barron one of three new assistant bishops of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, a move some insiders are calling noteworthy because of his wide social media presence. Barron is well known among church-going Catholics, since his video series on Catholicism is regularly shown in churches across the U.S. His appointment is both surprising and not surprising, said James Martin, editor at large of America magazine. “It’s surprising because bishops aren’t normally people who are so media savvy,” Martin said. “But given his talent and profile, I thought this was just a matter of time.” Read on.

• Proud to be a cafeteria Catholic[Isabella R. Moyer, U.S.Catholic, July 21] Today, the accusation of being a “cafeteria Catholic” is flung around with the same zealousness as the term “heretic” was at one time. … I once found great comfort in the black-and-white world of apologetics. The Catechism of the Catholic Church provided the answers to all of my questions concerning faith and morals. It was the definitive voice of the church, and I believed everything that voice said. And then my black-and-white world began to fall apart. Read on.

I once found great comfort in the black-and-white world of apologetics. The Catechism of the Catholic Church provided the answers to all of my questions concerning faith and morals. It was the definitive voice of the church, and I believed everything that vo - See more at: http://www.uscatholic.org/articles/201507/proud-be-cafeteria-catholic-30253#sthash.JW9Ax5dZ.dpuf

• Diocese of Allentown ... Here.
• Diocese of Scranton ... Here.
• United States Conference of Catholic Bishops ... Here
• Catholic News Service ... Here

The Vatican
• Reframing the question about Pope Francis’ trip to America[CRUX, John L. Allen Jr., July 16] A break-the-mold pope, the first ever from his part of the world, is preparing for a keenly anticipated visit to the United States. He comes amid perceptions that he may not be fully sold on America, and America may not be fully sold on him. He’s got astronomic approval ratings and is a media icon, but there are also unmistakable signals that he sees the United States as part of the problem as much as the solution. Many of the pope’s leading critics are Americans, inside and outside the Church, and his friends have warned him he may be in for a bumpy ride. Read on.

• On Pope Francis' landmark eight-day visit to South America
[Tablet, Margaret Hebblethwaite, July 16] Here.


• Vatican website ... Here
• Vatican Information Service blog ... Here.
• Vatican News/Info Portal ... Here.
• The Joy of the Gospel [Evangelii Gaudium] ... Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis, with detailed table of contents. Here.
A readers’ guide to “Laudato Si”[NCR, Thomas Reese, June 26] Chapter-by-chapter guidance with study questions to help in reading Pope Francis' encyclical on climate change. Intended for book clubs, classes and small discussion groups. Read on.


Health and Wellness
• Resources … below

BookSpin
• Before C.S.Lewis and J.R.R.Tolkien: The surprising faith of the author behind Alice in Wonderland[WaPo, Karen Swallow Prior, July 17] The 150th anniversary of “Alice in Wonderland” has been widely celebrated this year, but it is odd, a recent essay at the New Yorker notes, that how seldom the religion of its author, Lewis Carroll, is considered. The scant attention given to Carroll’s Christian faith is particularly striking since he is, in many ways, the direct predecessor of authors C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, who are practically Protestant saints in literary circles. Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll was Dodgson’s pen name) was a committed, lifelong member of the Church of England. Although he balked at taking Holy Orders, he was ordained as a deacon in the church in 1861. Although Dodgson hardly beat his readers over the head with his Christian beliefs, whispers of the glory of God echo throughout his work. Read on.

• Resources
… below.


Media/Films/TV/Music/Tech
• Resources … below.

VariaSpin
• Learn about opening an online Social Security account[USA.gov] Even if you’re nowhere near retirement, having an account will help you track your earnings, give you quicker access to manage the benefits you may be receiving, and much more. If you’re interested in learning more about how to open an account, this video walks you through the step-by-step process of setting one up. Read on.

• Basic guides to managing money … [USA.gov] Throughout the United States, people unfamiliar with our financial marketplace are more likely to fall prey to frauds and schemes. Low English literacy can make it even harder to manage money safely and effectively on a day-to-day basis. To help, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) developed a series of guides that provide information about various money matters. The following are among the topics the guides cover: • How to open a bank account • How to pay bills • How to shop for a mortgage • How to select financial services and products • Information on how to submit a complaint about a problem with a financial product or service. Read and share the Newcomer’s Guides to Managing Money; also available in Chinese, French, Haitian-Creole, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog and Vietnamese. You can also order hard copies directly from this page.

 

Resources

DioBeth
• Look for a Diocese of Bethlehem newsletter every Thursday … One or another newsletter is published every Thursday in the following order: (1) The Leadership News, (2) The newSpin newsletter, (3) The Diocesan e-Newsletter, (4) The newSpin newsletter.
   The Leadership News and the Diocesan e-Newsletter are official publications of the Diocese of Bethlehem. They include news, info, features and events relating to our diocese and parishes. Find the most recent Diocesan e-Newsletter, June 4, here. Find the most recent Leadership News, May 7, here.
   The newSpin newsletter is not an official publication – and will usually not duplicate news, info and features relating to our diocese and parishes found in the official newsletters. It is a relatively lengthy eclectic sampling of items related to religion – at times not, at times not so clearly – that the editor thinks readers might find to be of interest. It has been a kind of hobby of a onetime communication minister, the work of a volunteer who in retirement enjoys and dedicates time to do the research required. I always post the newSpin newsletter on the newSpin blog. If you wish to receive it by email, please send a note to Jo Trepagnier, jo@diobeth.org.

• Look online … for the Diocese of Bethlehem Facebook Page, Facebook Group (Bethlehem Episcopalians) and Twitter feed.

• Bethlehem Episcopalians … is a new Facebook group for conversations about mission, spirituality, Christian formation, and more. It was launched a few weeks ago and will replace the Bakery email list which has been taken down. "Bethlehem Episcopalians is an open group," wrote Archdeacon Rick Cluett, "which means that anyone can join and items that you post can be shared by group members on their own Facebook pages. This offers each of us the opportunity to reach a larger audience with news and conversations about what God is doing in our diocese." Join the Facebook group.

DioBeth website
Stumbling into the Sacred ... [Reflections on seeing God in the everyday by Canon Anne E. Kitch]
newSpin blog ... including the newSpin weekly by Bill Lewellis.
Facebook Page 
Facebook Group … Bethlehem Episcopalians
Twitter
Flickr
YouTube
Vimeo
LinkedIn

Center for Congregations ... The "Using Resources" series of publications by the Center for Congregations is designed to help congregations make the most effective use of capital funds, consultants, architects, contractors, books, congregation management software, and more.
Congregational Consulting ...  More information on how to contact the consultants can be found here and at http://www.congregationalconsulting.org/ .
• Church locators ... Here.
• ECF Vital Practices ... Here.
The Chalice, a publication created by Joan DeAcetis for older adults and caretakers. Download issues here.
• Weekly Bulletin Inserts from the Episcopal Church ... Here.
• Calendar of events in our parishes ... Here.

Episcopal/Anglican
• TREC [TaskForce for Reimagining the Episcopal Church] … website.
• TREC … Video Q&A with TREC panel at Oct. 2, 2014 TREC Churchwide Meeting at the Washington National Cathedral
• The Episcopal Church website, news service, news service blog,
Episcopal Café
• AngicansOnline website and news centre.
The Living Church
• The Anglican Communion website and news service.
• The Daily Scan: Contact publicaffairs@episcopalchurch.org to add subscribers for news releases, notices, statements, or Daily Scan.
• Free weekly bulletin inserts provide information about the history, music, liturgy, mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church. Find the inserts here.
Updated Episcopal Church canons and constitution ... Here.
• Forward Movement ... Here.
• Episcopal Web Radio ... Here.
• Episcopal Church Event Calendar ... Here

Ecumenical/Interfaith Relations

Franklin Graham had a revelation. On Friday, Graham said it has “dawned” on him on how to “fight the tide of moral decay that is being crammed down our throats by big business, the media, and the gay & lesbian community.”

His solution: stop doing business with LGBT-friendly companies.

- See more at: http://elielcruz.religionnews.com/2015/06/07/franklin-graham-calls-on-christians-to-blacklist-lgbt-friendly-companies/?email=blewellis%40diobeth.org#sthash.WI32aUeD.dpuf

SpiritSpin
• The Book of Common Prayer ... every edition from 1549 to 1979. Here.
• Prayers and Thanksgivings from the BCP ... Here.
• The (Online) Book of Common Prayer ... Here.
• The Daily Office ... can be read online in Rite I, Rite II or the New Zealand Prayer Book versions. At Mission St. Clare.
• The Daily Office ... from the Diocese of Indianapolis. Here.
• Daily Prayer ... a resource of Forward Movement. Here.
• Holy Women, Holy Men ... Download Holy Women, Holy Men as a .pdf file.
• Speaking to the Soul ... An Episcopal Café blog. Sermons, reflections, multimedia meditations and excerpts from books on spirituality. Here.
• The Imitation of Christ ... Available free online.

Evangelism/Stewardship/Church Growth
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.

• EpiscopalShare ... Here.

Bible&Worship
• The Lectionary ... A collection of Lectionary resources for the Episcopal Church, updated Sunday night. Here.
• Lectionary Page ... A liturgical calendar for upcoming weeks, with links to readings from the Revised Common Lectionary (RCL), as adapted for use in Episcopal worship. Here.
• Revised Common Lectionary ... Here.
• The Liturgical Calendar ... BCP, Lesser Feasts and Fasts, HWHM ... Here.
• Oremus Bible Browser ... Here.
• Celebrating the Eucharist, by Patrick Malloy. Google Book
• Enriching our Worship, 1 to 5 ... Free download here.
• The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant: Liturgical Resources for Blessing Same-Sex Relationships [Extracted from Liturgical Resources 1: I Will Bless You and You Will Be a Blessing] Here.
• Collection of worship resources at Diobeth.org ... Including Diocesan Cycles of Prayer for weekly worship, Holy Women Holy Men, and The Text This Week. Here.

Health and Wellness
• Resources for caregivers ... Here.
• Medline Plus ... Here
• WebMD ... Here.
• Alzheimers.gov ... For people helping people with Alzheimers. Here.
• Three Free Apps for getting qualified medical advice... [Techlicious] Urgent Care, HealthTap and First Aid. Info and links.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Center for Disease Control - Healthy Living
Church Health Reader

Eastern Pennsylvania Faith Community Nurses
Episcopal Mental Illness Network
Go4Life from the National Institute on Aging at NIH

National Episcopal Health Ministries
NEHM Wellness Resource Page 

Let's Move

News/info/commentary
• Religion News Service Daily Roundup ... here.
• Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project: Daily Religion Headlines ... here.
• Religious Freedom Blog ... a weekly look back at the top stories and developments on religious liberty around the world. Here.
• National Catholic Reporter ... here.
• BBC News Online ... here.
• BBC Religion & Ethics ... here.
• Faith in Public Life ... Here.
• Religion&Ethics News Weekly (PBS) ... Here.
• Religion Research Hub ... ARDA, Association of Religion Data Archives, an especially useful site.
• Back issues of the newSpin newsletter ... here.

Media/Film/TV/Books/Podcasts/Music/Tech
• Spirituality & Film ... Here.
• Spirituality on DVD ... Here.
• Books for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Audios for Spiritual Journeys ... Here.
• Free eBooks by Project Gutenberg  ... Here
• Free Audiobooks from LibriVox ... Here
• Free Audiobooks and eBooks ... Here and Here.
• Google Books ... Millions of books you can preview or read free. Here
• The Online Books Page ... from UPenn. Here.
• More free eBooks  and Audiobooks ... [Techlicious] Here.
• Telling the good news, in the media ... [Jim Naughton and Rebecca Wilson] If the media isn’t telling the stories you want told about your congregation, it is possible (we say very gently) that those stories aren’t interesting or significant enough to warrant coverage. Or, it is possible that you are not presenting them to the media in a way that catches their attention. Or perhaps you have not presented stories to the media at all. It isn’t easy to get your congregation, diocese, conference, or other sort of Christian organization into the newspaper or in online media outlets unless something has gone significantly wrong. It is even harder to get it on television or the radio. But it is possible if you absorb these 10 simple tips. Read on.
• Communicate … Your Ministry, including Bill's Communication Biases and Communication-Evangelism. Here.

Varia
• Insights into Religion ... Here.
• The Alban Institute ... Here.

Religious Freedom Recap, our weekly look back at the top stories and developments on religious liberty around the world. - See more at: http://brianpellot.religionnews.com/2013/09/16/burkini-compromise-pope-hearts-atheists-dozen-muslim-march-religious-freedom-recap-sept-9-sept-16/#sthash.nA6J6Y1Y.dpuf

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The newSpin newsletter is uploaded to the newSpin blog and posted on Bakery and on other diocesan lists of some 2,000 addresses. Many recipients forward it to others. It comes, of course, with some spin from the editor. The views expressed, implied or inferred in items or links contained in the newsletter or the blog do not represent the official view of the Diocese of Bethlehem unless expressed by or forwarded from the Bishop, the Standing Committee or the Archdeacon as an official communication. Comments are welcome on Bakery (if you are subscribed to that interactive list) and at the newSpin blog. At the newSpin blog, click in the right hand column on the title of the current newsletter. Then, make your comment below.

Bill Lewellis, Diocese of Bethlehem, retired
Communication Minister/Editor (1986-2010), Canon Theologian (1998-)
Blog , Email (c)610-393-1833
Be attentive. Be intelligent. Be reasonable. Be responsible.
Be in Love. And, if necessary, change. [Bernard Lonergan]

 

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